Tag Archives: practice

Free Interactive Worksheets! Test Your Reading Skills

Free Interactive Worksheets! Test Your Reading Skills

These free printable worksheets are taken from Purland Power Pack, which is a folder containing 2,000+ free PDF resources for teaching and learning English. You can download it here now.

Any Answers 1

Direct download: https://purlandtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/any-answers-1-interactive-worksheet-ir1.pdf

any-answers-1-interactive-worksheet-ir1

Any Answers 2

Direct download: https://purlandtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/any-answers-2-interactive-worksheet-ir2.pdf

any-answers-2-interactive-worksheet-ir2

Any Answers 3

Direct download: https://purlandtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/any-answers-3-interactive-worksheet-ir3.pdf

any-answers-3-interactive-worksheet-ir3

Any Answers 4

Direct download: https://purlandtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/any-answers-4-interactive-worksheet-ir4.pdf

any-answers-4-interactive-worksheet-ir4

 

Teaching Blog: Discussion Practice - Who Gives Way?

Teaching Blog: Discussion Practice – Who Gives Way?

Teaching Blog: Discussion Practice - Who Gives Way?
Picture the scene. You are walking on the pavement when you notice there is somebody coming towards you. If one of you does not move, you will bump into each other. There is room on your left (and their right) for somebody to move to (see picture above). But who moves?

  1. Do you move for the other person? Why?
  2. Do you keep going and when they also refuse to move you stop and wait for them to walk around you – if, in fact, they do?
  3. Do you keep your course and try to force them to move?

This is a fairly light-hearted discussion-based lesson about status, empathy for people we don’t know, etiquette, and personal prejudices.

You will need a set of cards for each group or pair. You can download these worksheets (PDF) below:

Picture the scene. You are walking on the pavement when you notice there is somebody coming towards you. If one of you does not move, you will bump into each other. There is room on your left (and their right) for somebody to move to (see picture above). But who moves? 1. Do you move for the other person? Why? 2. Do you keep going and when they also refuse to move you stop and wait for them to walk around you – if, in fact, they do? 3. Do you keep your course and try to force them to move? This is a fairly light-hearted discussion-based lesson about status, empathy for people we don’t know, etiquette, and personal prejudices. You will need a set of cards for each group or pair:

  • ‘People’ cards (pink)
  • ‘Appearance’ cards (blue)
  • ‘Activity’ cards – two different sets (yellow)
  • ‘Path’ cards (green)
  • Blank cards (white)

(Note: using card is not essential – you could also print the worksheets on normal paper. Card would be better if possible, and the different colours make them easily distinguishable!)

Activities:

  1. SS (students) could begin with discussion questions in pairs or small groups. Establish the proposition:
  • How often do you walk around your town?
  • Are you a confident walker or a nervous walker?
  • How often do you face the situation mentioned above during a normal walk?
  • What do you tend to do? Do you keep walking, stop, or give way? Why?
  • What factors influence your decision? For example: type of person, their appearance, their activity (what they are doing), and the kind of path you are on?
  • Have you ever been involved in an awkward ‘dance’ with somebody walking towards you, because both of you try to move out of the way in the same direction at the same time – and you keep doing it until one person finally stops?
  • Have you ever had an argument with somebody who bumped into you, or who wouldn’t get out of your way? What happened? How did you resolve it?

2. SS work in pairs or small groups. One person selects a random card from each of the four piles (blank cards are optional) and put them in a row. For example:

Teaching Blog: Discussion Practice - Who Gives Way?

They ask the other person: ‘What would you do in this situation – move, stop, or keep going?’ Discussion ensues. The student should state the main factor that influenced their decision (e.g. they give way because the person was elderly) and the next factor too (e.g. the person was carrying something large). Then the next student picks the cards for the next person and the discussion continues. Here are some more sample scenarios:
Teaching Blog: Discussion Practice - Who Gives Way?

SS can combine more than one person, appearance and/or activity. For example, there could be more than one person doing more than one activity. SS could add their own factors on the blank cards. Of course some of the scenarios may be absurd, e.g. you might select:

boy        heavily pregnant        throwing snowballs        beach

In that kind of situation SS could pick other cards to replace the absurd element(s). SS could talk about what happens if you swap around factors, e.g. swap the places in scenario one and three. SS could add ‘conditions’ (e.g. weather: too hot, too cold; raining, etc.) and ‘time’ (e.g. early morning, 11pm, etc.) to each scenario using the blank cards.

3. When SS have discussed 4, 6, or 8 different people and situations, they pick two of them and decide what would happen if those two people met on a path. SS discuss which factors are stronger and weaker. Which person trumps the other person in terms of not having to move out of the way? Why?

4. SS look at a number of different factors in an imaginary person coming towards you and rank them from strongest (you definitely have to move) to weakest (the other person definitely has to move.) SS should justify their reasons. Which factors are dead certs meaning you would have to move, e.g. young people may feel they have to move when faced with an elderly person coming towards them, while somebody else may decide they will not move when a cyclist is coming towards them, since the onus is on the person who is moving fastest to exercise move care. A man may decide that he must always move for a woman, and so on. Which single factor is the strongest? This could lead into a whole group discussion. As a twist, SS could discuss different scenarios when walking behind one or more person and trying to get past them – e.g. trying to pass a family group with a pushchair, dog, etc.

5. SS create and write a dialogue based on one or more of the scenarios and act it out for the rest of the group. Some of the combinations may well suggest dramatic scenes, for example: ‘an ugly boy pushing an empty shopping trolley down a hospital corridor…’ could suggest a heart-breaking situation.

6. SS practise writing and saying questions and answers with 2nd conditional, for example:

A: ‘What would you do if…?’
B: ‘I would…’

7. SS go out into the street in pairs or small groups with their notebooks and write down what happens when they get into different situations with different kinds of people walking towards them. What are their natural inclinations? Who do they give way (defer) to? Who do they expect to move? What happens if they change their normal walking behaviour? SS could interview members of the public or other students/staff members at about what they usually do. (Of course, I’m not in any way suggesting that SS should walk into other members of the public on purpose and write down what occurs! Care may need to be exercised.)

8. SS write an essay about the little-discussed ethics of walking around in public without bumping into each other. How has this lesson related to their lives and touched on their habits and prejudices? What will they take away from it? What will they do differently as a result of studying this discussion topic? Why? If nothing, why not?

9. SS stand in a group in the middle of the classroom; T (teacher) says a factor; SS move to one or other side of the class to vote for either ‘move’ or ‘keep going’. T has the definitive answer for each factor. SS who are wrong go out and sit down and the game continues until one person wins.

I hope you will enjoy using this original lesson plan from PurlandTraining.com! If you do use it, please let me know how it goes by contacting me (Matt Purland) here, or leave a comment below!


Teaching Blog: Discussion Practice - Who Gives Way?

Printable Worksheets (PDF):

‘People’ cards:

people-cards

‘Appearance’ cards:

appearance-cards

‘Activity’ cards – Page 1:

activity-gerund-cards-page-1

‘Activity’ cards – Page 2:

activity-gerund-cards-page-2

‘Path’ cards:

path-cards

Blank cards:

blank-cards

Title image: https://pixabay.com/

FREE Video Class! Why Learn English with Music?

FREE Video Class! Why Learn English with Music?

Wondering how and why we should learn English with music? Watch this great video from Next Step English to get some invaluable tips!

You can view all of their videos here.

Further study:

Is Spaced Practice the key to good ELT? Dellar ‘s 2018 IATEFL presentation

Is Spaced Practice the key to good ELT? Dellar ‘s 2018 IATEFL presentation

Is Spaced Practice the key to good ELT? Dellar ‘s 2018 IATEFL presentation
— Read on criticalelt.wordpress.com/2018/04/15/is-spaced-practice-the-key-to-good-elt-dellar-s-2018-iatefl-presentation/

NEW! Reading Comprehension: First non-stop scheduled flight from Australia to Britain

New on Purland Training this week!

Click here for our brand new reading comprehension lesson plan!

NEW! Reading Comprehension: First non-stop scheduled flight from Australia to Britain

Reading Comprehension: First non-stop scheduled flight from Australia to Britain

 

Singing - Discussion Words

FREE Podcast! Episode 9 – Vocabulary Words about Singing

Let’s have a fun listening activity on the topic of singing! I’m going to read out loud forty vocabulary words – four words at a time – and you have to either say them out loud or write them down. Check if you’ve got everything right by downloading the free vocabulary handout here:

Singing – Discussion Words

This activity is probably more suitable for learners at Intermediate level and above!

Don’t forget to subscribe and leave a comment on iTunes please!

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/purland-on-elt/id1204714487?mt=2

Image courtesy of Pixabay.com.

FREE Podcast! Episode 8 – Question Tags

Learn about how we use question tags in English. This episode is a really exciting grammar one, isn’t it? Yes, it is! Don’t forget to subscribe and leave a review on iTunes – thanks!

https://purlandtraining.podbean.com/e/episode-8-question-tags/

You can download the free lesson notes and six worksheets for practising question tags from here:

Podcast 8 – Lesson Notes – Question Tags (PDF)

Question Tags – Six Worksheets (PDF)

Answers to worksheets:

Question Tags Worksheets - Answers

7 facts about question tags:

  1. Statement – usually short – plus question tag, with a question mark.
  2. They are often used in spoken English.
  3. In many languages (e.g. Polish) we can use the equivalent of …yes? In English we can say: yes, yeah, right (Am/E), OK, got it, understand, but the tone can be rude and confrontational/angry; too direct; English is not a direct language; it sounds like an order, and we don’t like direct orders. (In Polish, use tak for checking and no nie or nie prawda for small talk (but this sounds old fashioned – old people say this), or no tag.)
  4. We can use any auxiliary verbs, including modal auxiliary verbs. Present simple can be confusing – you have to choose DO/DOES or BE. Also past simple: DID or WAS/WERE. We use contractions; in rhetorical speech we can say, Is it not? Were we not? etc.
  5. It is not as common with pronoun I. I’m… aren’t I? (This is an oddity – we can’t say am not I? amn’t I? There is no contraction for am not.)
  6. We can use them to sound sarcastic, e.g. ‘That was a great film, wasn’t it?’ My descending tone shows that I believe the opposite – it was not a great film.

They are more difficult to use than they look – because of the thought process…

The thought process of using question tags:

  1. Realise what tense it is

e.g. They’re meeting at ten, aren’t they? (present continuous)

  1. Realise what pronoun is used (e.g. two names become they) and match it

They … they

  1. Is it a singular or plural subject? They = plural
  2. Positive – negative; negative (even without not, e.g. never) – positive; do the opposite

They’re meeting… = positive, so the question tag has to be negative: …aren’t they

  1. Match the auxiliary verb – are > aren’t
  2. Understand the context: need info or checking/making small talk; intonation differs:

we are asking a question; we want an answer: information – voice goes up

we are sure that the listener agrees with us; something is obvious; we are just making (phatic: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phatic_expression) conversation; we want a response that means a quick agreement – voice goes down

We need information – we’re making plans

Lesson Plan:

  1. SS write x short statements on the board – half of them positive and half negative
  2. T elicits how to gain information or check (small talk) – tak? Look at English options; elicit wrong register/tone; SS practise some sentences together with the wrong tone
  3. Try to elicit question tags; discuss the main points and the thought process
  4. SS complete one or more of the worksheets – check the answers

SS write their own sentences with question tags (or for homework)

Other forms:

  • Positive imperative: Stay here, will / won’t you?
  • Negative imperative: Don’t move, will you?
  • Let’s: Let’s go to the fair, shall we?
  • Need to: We need to return this form, don’t we?
  • There is/are: There’s a cow in that field, isn’t there?
  • There isn’t: There isn’t any jam left, is there?
  • Somebody is/isn’t: Somebody is late, aren’t they? / Somebody isn’t… are they?
Indirect Questions - Board Plan

FREE Podcast! Episode 7 – Indirect Questions Challenge!

Dare you take up the indirect questions challenge? Or, would it be possible for you to take up the indirect questions challenge? 🙂 If you do, please let me know how you get on!

Please subscribe and leave a review on iTunes or at Podbean.com. Thank you!

Please follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/purlandtraining

Here’s the original board plan from the lesson on Tuesday:

Indirect Questions - Board Plan