Tag Archives: ELT

100 Common English Homographs - Reference + Gap-Fill Activity

100 Common English Homographs – Reference + Gap-Fill Activity

100 Common English Homographs – Reference + Gap-Fill Activity

This is a brand new free printable worksheet for English teachers and students at Elementary level and above. Homographs are words which have the same spelling, but different sounds and meanings, for example, ‘live’ (on TV) and ‘live’ (reside). ‘Homograph’ comes from the Greek words homos (same) + graph (writing).

Featuring 100 common English homographs, this useful resource will help students to understand this topic in English vocabulary. The accompanying gap-fill worksheet (below) allows students to research and find the different contexts for each homograph pair.

If you have any feedback about this free resource, we’d love to hear from you! Please feel free to leave a comment or review below or on Facebook or Twitter.

Direct download: https://purlandtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/100-common-english-homographs.pdf

100 Common English Homographs – Reference


Direct download: https://purlandtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/100-common-english-homographs-gap-fill.pdf

100 Common English Homographs – Gap-Fill Activity

Practice Listening Skills in English with Micro Dictations

Practice Listening Skills in English with Micro Dictations

This is a guest post by Chris Bargery from MicroEnglish.net. Follow him on Twitter and Facebook. If you would like to feature your product or service on PurlandTraining.com, please get in touch.

Practice Listening Skills in English with Micro Dictations

Practice Listening Skills in English with Micro Dictations

Practice Listening Skills in English with Micro Dictations

When you listen to native English speakers, do you understand everything, or just enough to survive?

Most students find listening extremely difficult. Native speakers talk very quickly, connect words together, speak in a wide range of accents, and use lots of difficult language like phrasal verbs and idioms. All of this can make understanding them difficult and stressful!

Most students get very good at what I call ‘survival listening’ – understanding just enough to survive. Maybe they only understand 20-30% of what they hear, but that is usually enough to get the message, especially if they understand the context.

For example, imagine one of your colleagues says to you on Monday morning:

“Blip blap blop blep weekend?”

You only understand one thing (the word ‘weekend’), but because it is Monday morning you can make a good guess that your friendly colleague wants to hear about your weekend! You’ve survived.

The site features a wide range of listening activities

The site features a wide range of useful listening activities

This kind of listening is a very useful skill, but it is also really important for students to get better at a different kind of listening – decoding the stream of speech into individual words and phrases which you then use to understand what is being said.

Using the previous example, you would understand that your colleague said:

“What did you do at the weekend?”

Being able to correctly identify individual words and phrases means that you don’t need to make so many guesses. You are no longer just surviving, you’re understanding!

So, how do you get better at this kind of listening? The key is intensive listening.

Listen very closely to this short sentence:

Try to understand and write down every word that you hear. Listen as many times as you need to (seriously – listen 100 times if you have to!) and then check your answer at the bottom of this post.

Try to think about your mistakes. Why did you miss or misunderstand a word? Did the speaker pronounce it strangely? Was it connected to other words?

I think of this kind of listening practice as like sending your ears to the gym. It’s not easy, but it will make you a much stronger listener over time.

An interactive activity on MicroEnglish.net

An interactive activity on MicroEnglish.net

With regular practice, you will get better at automatically recognising individual sounds and phrases. You won’t need to worry so much about making guesses, so you will have more brain power available to plan what you’re going to say.

To do intensive listening, all you need is some audio with subtitles or a transcript. Ted Talks is a good start. My own site, MicroEnglish, provides lots of English listening exercises which are specifically designed to give students regular intensive listening practice. It has a large and growing archive of interactive dictations to give you practice understanding rapid conversational English in lots of different accents.

Do a little bit of intensive listening practice every day and you’ll quickly become a stronger and more confident listener in English. Good luck!


Try the interactive activity based on this phrasal verb by clicking here.


Answer to micro-dictation: I have to drop the children off at school at 9, so I’ll be with you at about 9.30.

200 Common Minimal Pairs in English - Reference + Gap-Fill Activity

200 Common Minimal Pairs in English – Reference + Gap-Fill Activity

200 Common Minimal Pairs in English – Reference + Gap-Fill Activity

This is a brand new free printable worksheet for English teachers and students at Elementary level and above.

Featuring 200 common minimal pairs in English, this useful reference resource aims to improve students’ understanding of differences between spelling and sounds in English, specifically helping them to identify and work on particular sounds which they may find problematic.

The accompanying gap-fill worksheet (below) allows students to research and find the matching part of each minimal pair. If you have any feedback about this free resource, we’d love to hear from you! Please feel free to leave a comment or review below or on Facebook or Twitter.

Direct download: https://purlandtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/200-common-minimal-pairs-in-english.pdf

200-common-minimal-pairs-in-english

Direct download: https://purlandtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/200-common-minimal-pairs-in-english-gap-fill.pdf

200 Common Minimal Pairs in English (Gap-Fill)

Images (ball / bowl) by Clker-Free-Vector-Images and OpenClipart-Vectors from Pixabay

Home Security – Do's and Don’ts (ESOL Discussion Activity)

Home Security – Do’s and Don’ts (ESOL Discussion Activity)

Home Security – Do’s and Don’ts (ESOL Discussion Activity)

Work with a partner or small group. Discuss the following statements about home security. Decide whether each belongs in the DO’S list or the DON’TS list and say why (answers may vary):

  • Close all the windows before going out.
  • When someone you don’t know comes to the door, ask to see their ID.
  • Learn a martial art so that you can deal with burglars effectively if they break into your home.
  • Don’t tell anyone your address, even your family and friends.
  • Ask a friend to call round a couple of times to check the house while you are away on holiday.
  • Fit several large locks to the inside of the front door.
  • Leave a spare key under a flowerpot outside near the front door.
  • Lock the front door when you leave the house.
  • Stay in all day and all night, just in case.
  • Leave on a radio or the TV when you go out at night.
smart home diagram

Have you turned your home into a smart home? How did you do it? Why? Discuss how each of the symbols relate to home security.

  • Keep all tools and garden equipment safely locked in the shed.
  • Have a spare front door key cut and give it to a trusted friend, in case you lose your own key.
  • Tell everyone you know that you’re going on holiday and for how long the house will be empty.
  • Leave a tall ladder in the garden leaning up against the wall near an open bathroom window.
  • Make sure that you have enough home contents insurance cover for all of your possessions and valuables, in case your house is burgled.
  • Put an address label on the key fob that has your house key on it.
  • Leave the front door unlocked when you go to bed at night.
  • Cancel the milk and papers for the period when you are away on holiday.
  • Close all the curtains before leaving the house.
  • Build a two-metre-high metal perimeter wall around your property and land.
Home Security

Is it enough to have a sign? Or do you need to have a dog too?

Extract from Big Grammar Book Intermediate Book 1 which you can download FREE here!


Images:

Title image: Brennan Ehrhardt

Smart Home: Image by Pixaline from Pixabay

Beware of dog: Tyler Nix

10 Good Reasons NOT to Read - Infographic

10 Good Reasons NOT to Read – Infographic

10 Good Reasons NOT to Read – Infographic

This is a brand new infographic for English teachers and students at Elementary level and above. Why not use it to spark discussion with your English language students? How far do you agree with the sentiments expressed? Why? What is the real meaning of the infographic?

10 Good Reasons NOT to Read - Infographic

10 Good Reasons NOT to Read – Infographic

10 Good Reasons NOT to Read

We all know that reading is BORING, but here are 10 more reasons not to read:

  1. You have LESS time to play with your phone.
  2. Cool kids DO NOT read books.
  3. You CANNOT take a selfie with a book.
  4. Books contain words, which can be DIFFICULT to understand.
  5. It is DEMANDING to imagine a story in your mind.
  6. Books are HEAVY to carry around all day.
  7. Why read when it is easier to WATCH and SCROLL?
  8. Books are NOT FREE (except at the library) – unlike social media.
  9. Ignorance is BLISS!
  10. If you read, you could become SMARTER than me.

If you have any feedback about this free resource, we’d love to hear from you! Please feel free to leave a comment or review below or on Facebook or Twitter.


Image by GraphicMama-team from Pixabay and http://www.clker.com/clipart-wrong-x.html

May They Marry? FREE ESOL Lesson Plan

May They Marry? FREE ESOL Lesson Plan

May They Marry? FREE ESOL Lesson Plan

This is a brand new free lesson plan for English and ESOL teachers and students at Intermediate level and above.

We are often told that ‘If two people love each other, they should be allowed to marry. Love wins!‘ But how true is this? May we really marry who we like? What does the law say? Students work in pairs or small groups and discuss marriage law in the UK and around the world, while learning useful new vocabulary associated with family, relationships, and social status.

If you have any feedback about this free resource, we’d love to hear from you! Please feel free to leave a comment or review below or on Facebook or Twitter.

Direct download: https://purlandtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/may-they-marry-lesson-plan.pdf

may-they-marry-lesson-plan

Direct download: https://purlandtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/criteria-page-1.pdf

May They Marry? Criteria – Page 1

Direct download: https://purlandtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/criteria-page-2.pdf

May They Marry? Criteria – Page 2

Direct download: https://purlandtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/people-cards.pdf

people-cards

Direct download: https://purlandtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/criteria-blank-cards.pdf

criteria-blank-cards

Image by StockSnap from Pixabay

200 Common English Homophones - Reference + Gap-Fill Activity

200 Common English Homophones – Reference + Gap-Fill Activity

200 Common English Homophones – Reference + Gap-Fill Activity

This is a brand new free printable worksheet for English teachers and students at Elementary level and above.

Featuring 200 common English homophone pairs, this useful reference resource aims to improve vocabulary, pronunciation, and spelling skills, helping students to learn that some common English words sound the same as each other but have different spellings and different meanings.

The accompanying gap-fill worksheet (below) allows students to research and find the matching homophones. If you have any feedback about this free resource, we’d love to hear from you! Please feel free to leave a comment or review below or on Facebook or Twitter.

Direct download: https://purlandtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/200-common-english-homophones.pdf

200 Common English Homophones – Reference

Screenshot


Direct download: https://purlandtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/200-common-english-homophones-gap-fill.pdf

200 Common English Homophones – Gap-Fill Activity

Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay

Introducing eslactive.com resource website!

Introducing eslactive.com – the GREEN resource website!

Introducing eslactive.com – the GREEN resource website!

I recently contacted eslactive.com on Twitter to ask them about their new website, which they founded in 2018. Here’s what they told me:

eslactive.com is a website made by English teachers, for English teachers. After experiencing first-hand the amount of paper we use in language schools every day, we felt compelled to try and make our industry a little greener. That’s why we list hundreds of free games, activities, projects and conversation ideas you can employ without printed materials.

Introducing eslactive.com resource website!

“Another key part of our vision is the use of technology in the classroom. We recognise that it’s not always possible, and that new techniques can be daunting. However, we strongly believe that it will not only benefit the environment, but increase student engagement too. To allow you to explore the possibilities at your own pace, we’ve also developed a wide range of fun interactive games and generators.

Introducing eslactive.com resource website!

“Most importantly, we understand how busy teachers are, so we want to make your life as easy as possible. All our resources are categorised and tagged by grammar/vocabulary topics, so you can find what you need quickly. There’s even the option to add activities to your own custom lesson plans, so you can save ideas for later.

“We hope you enjoy using the site, and are always here to help if needed.”

eslactive.com – it’s especially for you if you’re an EFL or ESL teacher – or both.

Why not check it out today!


If you run a great English language teaching resource website, and would like it to be featured on Purland Training, please contact us here!