Tag Archives: vocabulary

15 Top Business English Idioms

15 Top Business English Idioms

15 Top Business English Idioms

Are you up to speed with the latest business English idioms? Here are some of the top English idioms that you could use in a business context. How many of them do you know?

Let’s get the ball rolling!


More English idioms – 15 Fantastically Fishy English Idioms!


1. To get something off the ground = To begin or launch something

To get something off the ground = To begin or launch something

  • I can’t wait to get this project off the ground!
  • I can’t wait to begin this project!

2. To get the ball rolling = To start, e.g. a meeting or debate

To get the ball rolling = To start, e.g. a meeting or debate

  • Let’s get the ball rolling.
  • Let’s start.

3. To think outside the box = To think in an original or left-field / lateral way

To think outside the box = To think in an original or left-field / lateral way

  • Try to think outside the box.
  • Try to think in an original or unique way.

4. In a nutshell = In short

In a nutshell = In short

  • In a nutshell, I just don’t feel that Martin is right for the position.
  • In short, I just don’t feel that Martin is right for the position.

5. ASAP = As soon as possible (acronym)

ASAP = As soon as possible (acronym)

  • I need that report ASAP!
  • I need that report as soon as possible.

6. To stand your ground = To have complete confidence in your position or idea

To stand your ground = To have complete confidence in your position or idea

  • If we stand our ground, they will sign the contract!
  • If we stick to our position, they will sign the contract!

7. The bottom line = The most important thing / the main priority

The bottom line = The most important thing / the main priority

  • ‘What’s the bottom line?’ ‘We must send the orders today!’
  • ‘What’s the most important thing?’ ‘We must send the orders today!’

8. The elephant in the room = The uncomfortable truth that nobody wants to acknowledge

The elephant in the room = The uncomfortable truth that nobody wants to acknowledge

  • The elephant in the room is that we know their sales forecasts!
  • The thing that nobody wants to mention is that we know their sales forecasts!

9. To corner the market = To become the leading seller of a product

To corner the market = To become the leading seller of a product

  • Since 2012 we have been able to corner the market in toothbrush holders.
  • Since 2012 we have been able to become the leading seller of toothbrush holders.

10. To climb the corporate ladder = To be focused on gaining promotion within a company

To climb the corporate ladder = To be focused on gaining promotion within a company

  • John only cares about climbing the corporate ladder.
  • John only cares about trying to get promoted.

11. To hit the glass ceiling = To reach an artificial  limit of promotion, usually due to race, or gender

To hit the glass ceiling = To reach an artificial limit of promotion, usually due to race, or gender

  • Alison feels she has hit the glass ceiling at work.
  • Alison feels she can’t be promoted at work any further, because she is a woman.

12. To be in the red = To be in debt / To be in the black = To be in profit or solvent

To be in the red = To be in debt / To be in the black = To be in profit or solvent

  • No, the company is still in the red, but it could be in the black next month.
  • No, the company is still in debt, but it could be in profit next month.

13. To get the sack = To lose your job

To get the sack = To lose your job

  • Billy got the sack yesterday.
  • Billy lost his job yesterday.

14. To throw in the towel = To quit

To throw in the towel = To quit

  • I’m just about ready to throw in the towel!
  • I’m just about ready to quit!

15. To go / get back to the drawing board = To start again

To go / get back to the drawing board = To start again

  • OK, let’s go back to the drawing board.
  • OK, let’s start again.

 

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15 Fantastically Fishy English Idioms!

15 Fantastically Fishy English Idioms!

Do you like fish? Do you like English idioms? Yes? Then you’re going to love this fun fishy feature, which focuses on fifteen fab English idioms about our fantastic fishy friends!

  1. He’s a big fish in a small pond. = He has power and influence, but only in a limited area.

He's a big fish in a small pond.

2. He’s a cold fish. = He’s an unemotional person.

He's a cold fish.

3. I think she was fishing for a compliment. = I think she was trying to get a compliment.

I think she was fishing for a compliment.

4. It’s like shooting fish in a barrel. = It’s very easy.

It's like shooting fish in a barrel.

5. Hmm, something smells fishy. = Something seems suspicious.

Hmm, something smells fishy.

6. I’ve got bigger fish to fry. = I’ve got more important things to do.

I've got bigger fish to fry.

7. Her dad drinks like a fish. = Her dad drinks a lot [of alcohol].

Her dad drinks like a fish.

8. I felt a bit green around the gills. = I felt sick.

I felt a bit green around the gills.

9. They fell for that joke hook, line, and sinker! = They fell for that joke – completely.

They fell for that joke hook, line, and sinker!

10. That’s a different kettle of fish. = That’s a different matter.

That's a different kettle of fish.

11. There are plenty more fish in the sea. = You will find another person to love.

There are plenty more fish in the sea.

12. Your grandma is an odd fish, isn’t she? = Your grandma is strange, isn’t she?

Your grandma is an odd fish, isn't she?

13. What’s that got to do with the price of fish? = What’s that got to do with anything?

What's that got to do with the price of fish?

14. The train was so busy! We were packed in like sardines! = The train was so busy! The passengers had to stand very close together.

The train was so busy! We were packed in like sardines!

15. I felt like a fish out of water. = I felt uncomfortable and out of place.

I felt like a fish out of water.

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150 Words which are both Verbs and Nouns

150 Words which are both Verbs and Nouns

150 Words which are both Verbs and Nouns:

150 Words which are both Verbs and Nouns

150 Words which are both Verbs and Nouns

Find this and many more helpful exercises in the free Big Grammar Book Intermediate Book 1 – Download Now!

150 Words which are both Verbs and Nouns:

act
address
aim
answer
attack
balance
bear
benefit
blame
block
blow
broadcast
brush
buy
care
cause
claim
comfort
contrast
control
cook
copy
crack
crash
curl
curve
cut
cycle
design
dislike
display
doubt
drink
email
end
escape
estimate
exchange
excuse
experience
face
fight
film
finish
fish
flood
flow
fold
form
function
guess
guide
heat
help
hold
hope
humour
hurry
increase
influence
insult
interest
joke
judge
jump
kick
kiss
knock
land
laugh
lift
light
limit
link
look
love
march
mark
match
mind
name
need
notice
object
order
paint
place
plane
plant
play
post
process
promise
protest
question
race
rain
record
repair
reply
report
request
rescue
respect
result
return
ring
risk
roll
row
rule
sand
search
shape
shelter
shock
shop
show
sign
signal
silence
sketch
smile
smoke
sound
stamp
start
state
step
sting
stop
struggle
study
suit
supply
support
surprise
taste
test
trade
train
transport
trick
trust
turn
twist
type
use
value
visit

Try the New Learning App from Context: Learn Words by Reading

Try the New Learning App from Context: Learn Words by Reading

Try the New Learning App from Context: Learn Words by Reading

Try the New Learning App from Context: Learn Words by Reading

Introducing Context, the learning app that improves your vocabulary through the daily habit of reading.

Each day, Context sends you a personalised digest of news articles and alerts that teach you interesting words. Throw out your flashcards and start learning by reading!

With Context you can:

– Discover new words you don’t know
– Test your knowledge with vocabulary quizzes for articles you read
– Subscribe to news alerts for words that you’re learning
– Browse hundreds of curated words to reach your study goals
– Track your progress and level up your profile
– Focus on the words that really matter

From students to life long learners, Context is the perfect daily solution for learning words.

Download it from the App Store now, or find out more here:

Twitter: @ContextLearning

Website: https://contextlearning.app/

Say, Tell, Talk, or Speak? 1

Say, Tell, Talk, or Speak? 1

It’s grammar time! Do you know when to use say, tell, talk, or speak?

Say and tell have different uses in English:

Say, Tell, Talk, or Speak? 1

Talk and speak are physical actions. Their meanings are quite similar, with a few key differences:

Say, Tell, Talk, or Speak? 1

Complete each gap with say, tell, talk, or speak in the appropriate form:

1. Generally ________, there will be room for around a hundred guests at the wedding.
2. Look, would you just ________ me the truth about Babs, please?
3. ‘And then she told me to get lost!’ ‘What an awful thing to ________!’
4. When Janet resigned in front of the board, I was so shocked I could hardly ________!
5. Robbie ________ a joke in class, but nobody saw the funny side of it.
6. Could you ________ up, please? I’m a bit deaf.
7. I’ll give you the stuffing with the turkey for free. Now, I can’t ________ fairer than that.
8. ‘John said the company is close to collapse!’ ‘No! He’s ________ utter rubbish.’
9. It’s vital that I ________ to my doctor about the test results.
10. Peter ________ good morning to Alice when he met her in the car park.
11. Darren has really enjoyed ________ to his kids on the way home from Ireland.
12. ‘You can’t park here, mate.’ ‘OK, whatever you ________.’
13. Just stop ________ me what to do!
14. When the plane had finally landed, we got in a taxi and ________ for hours.
15. My sister was ________ to her boyfriend about her holiday.
16. I was trying to ________ them about the paintings, but they preferred the gift shop.
17. Geoff? Good. Phil here. OK. We need to ________ business.
18. OK, everyone get ready. I’m going to take the picture. ________ cheese!
19. Is it true that Ellen ________ Norwegian fluently?
20. The grass snake was as big as a python – I’m ________ you!

Answers:

Say, Tell, Talk, or Speak? 1

Taken from Big Grammar Book Intermediate Book 1download it FREE here!

20 English Phrasal Verbs with RUN (Infographic)

20 English Phrasal Verbs with RUN (Infographic)

Improve your English vocabulary by learning and using these 20 English phrasal verbs with RUN:

20 English Phrasal Verbs with RUN (Infographic)

20 English Phrasal Verbs with RUN (Infographic)

20 English Phrasal Verbs with RUN:

run about – run during play
run across – discover
run after – chase
run away – flee
run down – list
run somebody down – criticise
run into somebody – meet accidentally
run into something – encounter a problem
run off – print copies
run off with somebody – elope
run on – keep running
run on – be powered by
run out (of) – have none left
run out on – abandon
run over – hit with a vehicle
run something past somebody – check
run through something – preview
run to – reach a certain amount
run up (a bill) – spend a lot
run with something – accept and support

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Purland's Word of the Day! Haughty

Purland’s Word of the Day! Haughty

Purland’s Word of the Day! Haughty

Increase your word power with Purland’s Word of the Day!

Are you haughty? Do you know anybody who is haughty? Let’s hope not!

A haughty person is somebody who is proud and arrogant and acts in a disdainful and stuck-up manner. You get the feeling that they think they’re much better than you – and everybody else, for that matter.

If you are haughty you believe you are superior, but in reality you are just too big for your boots – you have too high an opinion of yourself and could be described as vain or even an egomaniac!

If you know anybody who is haughty – or if you are haughty – please tell us about it in the comments below!


‘Terry’s boss is so haughty. She storms around the office all day barking orders at people. It’s really not on!’


adverb: haughtily

abstract noun: haughtiness

opposite adjectives: humble, unassuming

sounds like: naughty (in British English), body (in American English)

tone: formal / literary English

stress: first syllable

origin: 16th century French


Images:  freestocks.org

Learn Animals Vocabulary with this Free Word Search (PDF)!

Learn how to spell 20 animals in English with this great free word search (pdf).

Can you find the bear and the gorilla? What about the hippopotamus? Where is the tiger hiding? Check it out – and print it out – below. Full answers included:

Direct download: https://purlandtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/word-search-find-20-animals.pdf

Learn Animals Vocabulary with this Free Word Search (PDF)!

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