Tag Archives: idioms

David and Goliath – Idioms of Surprise

David and Goliath – Idioms of Surprise

David and Goliath – Idioms of Surprise


Get more FREE Bible study worksheets [Click Here]


Learn English through Bible study! Discover 30 English idiom of surprise with this free printable worksheet – including full answers – based on the Bible story of David and Goliath in 1 Samuel 17:1-58.

This worksheet is free and in the public domain, so please feel free to share it widely!

Direct download: https://purlandtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Q-david-and-goliath-dialogue-v2.pdf

David and Goliath – Idioms of Surprise

Answers:

Direct download: https://purlandtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/A-david-and-goliath-dialogue.pdf

A-david-and-goliath-dialogue

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Get more FREE Bible study worksheets [Click Here]


 

200 Top English Idioms

If You Only Ever Learn 200 English Idioms, Learn These!

200 Top English Idioms

Here are 200 of the most common everyday English idioms that native speakers use all the time. Check how many you already know, then make a conscious effort to learn the rest.

If you only ever learn 200 English idioms, learn these!

If You Only Ever Learn 200 English Idioms, Learn These!

Title image: https://pixabay.com

15 Top Business English Idioms

15 Top Business English Idioms

15 Top Business English Idioms

Are you up to speed with the latest business English idioms? Here are some of the top English idioms that you could use in a business context. How many of them do you know?

Let’s get the ball rolling!


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1. To get something off the ground = To begin or launch something

To get something off the ground = To begin or launch something

  • I can’t wait to get this project off the ground!
  • I can’t wait to begin this project!

2. To get the ball rolling = To start, e.g. a meeting or debate

To get the ball rolling = To start, e.g. a meeting or debate

  • Let’s get the ball rolling.
  • Let’s start.

3. To think outside the box = To think in an original or left-field / lateral way

To think outside the box = To think in an original or left-field / lateral way

  • Try to think outside the box.
  • Try to think in an original or unique way.

4. In a nutshell = In short

In a nutshell = In short

  • In a nutshell, I just don’t feel that Martin is right for the position.
  • In short, I just don’t feel that Martin is right for the position.

5. ASAP = As soon as possible (acronym)

ASAP = As soon as possible (acronym)

  • I need that report ASAP!
  • I need that report as soon as possible.

6. To stand your ground = To have complete confidence in your position or idea

To stand your ground = To have complete confidence in your position or idea

  • If we stand our ground, they will sign the contract!
  • If we stick to our position, they will sign the contract!

7. The bottom line = The most important thing / the main priority

The bottom line = The most important thing / the main priority

  • ‘What’s the bottom line?’ ‘We must send the orders today!’
  • ‘What’s the most important thing?’ ‘We must send the orders today!’

8. The elephant in the room = The uncomfortable truth that nobody wants to acknowledge

The elephant in the room = The uncomfortable truth that nobody wants to acknowledge

  • The elephant in the room is that we know their sales forecasts!
  • The thing that nobody wants to mention is that we know their sales forecasts!

9. To corner the market = To become the leading seller of a product

To corner the market = To become the leading seller of a product

  • Since 2012 we have been able to corner the market in toothbrush holders.
  • Since 2012 we have been able to become the leading seller of toothbrush holders.

10. To climb the corporate ladder = To be focused on gaining promotion within a company

To climb the corporate ladder = To be focused on gaining promotion within a company

  • John only cares about climbing the corporate ladder.
  • John only cares about trying to get promoted.

11. To hit the glass ceiling = To reach an artificial  limit of promotion, usually due to race, or gender

To hit the glass ceiling = To reach an artificial limit of promotion, usually due to race, or gender

  • Alison feels she has hit the glass ceiling at work.
  • Alison feels she can’t be promoted at work any further, because she is a woman.

12. To be in the red = To be in debt / To be in the black = To be in profit or solvent

To be in the red = To be in debt / To be in the black = To be in profit or solvent

  • No, the company is still in the red, but it could be in the black next month.
  • No, the company is still in debt, but it could be in profit next month.

13. To get the sack = To lose your job

To get the sack = To lose your job

  • Billy got the sack yesterday.
  • Billy lost his job yesterday.

14. To throw in the towel = To quit

To throw in the towel = To quit

  • I’m just about ready to throw in the towel!
  • I’m just about ready to quit!

15. To go / get back to the drawing board = To start again

To go / get back to the drawing board = To start again

  • OK, let’s go back to the drawing board.
  • OK, let’s start again.

 

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15 Fantastically Fishy English Idioms!

15 Fantastically Fishy English Idioms!

Do you like fish? Do you like English idioms? Yes? Then you’re going to love this fun fishy feature, which focuses on fifteen fab English idioms about our fantastic fishy friends!

  1. He’s a big fish in a small pond. = He has power and influence, but only in a limited area.

He's a big fish in a small pond.

2. He’s a cold fish. = He’s an unemotional person.

He's a cold fish.

3. I think she was fishing for a compliment. = I think she was trying to get a compliment.

I think she was fishing for a compliment.

4. It’s like shooting fish in a barrel. = It’s very easy.

It's like shooting fish in a barrel.

5. Hmm, something smells fishy. = Something seems suspicious.

Hmm, something smells fishy.

6. I’ve got bigger fish to fry. = I’ve got more important things to do.

I've got bigger fish to fry.

7. Her dad drinks like a fish. = Her dad drinks a lot [of alcohol].

Her dad drinks like a fish.

8. I felt a bit green around the gills. = I felt sick.

I felt a bit green around the gills.

9. They fell for that joke hook, line, and sinker! = They fell for that joke – completely.

They fell for that joke hook, line, and sinker!

10. That’s a different kettle of fish. = That’s a different matter.

That's a different kettle of fish.

11. There are plenty more fish in the sea. = You will find another person to love.

There are plenty more fish in the sea.

12. Your grandma is an odd fish, isn’t she? = Your grandma is strange, isn’t she?

Your grandma is an odd fish, isn't she?

13. What’s that got to do with the price of fish? = What’s that got to do with anything?

What's that got to do with the price of fish?

14. The train was so busy! We were packed in like sardines! = The train was so busy! The passengers had to stand very close together.

The train was so busy! We were packed in like sardines!

15. I felt like a fish out of water. = I felt uncomfortable and out of place.

I felt like a fish out of water.

Meme maker: https://www.kapwing.com/meme-maker

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20 English Phrasal Verbs with RUN (Infographic)

20 English Phrasal Verbs with RUN (Infographic)

Improve your English vocabulary by learning and using these 20 English phrasal verbs with RUN:

20 English Phrasal Verbs with RUN (Infographic)

20 English Phrasal Verbs with RUN (Infographic)

20 English Phrasal Verbs with RUN:

run about – run during play
run across – discover
run after – chase
run away – flee
run down – list
run somebody down – criticise
run into somebody – meet accidentally
run into something – encounter a problem
run off – print copies
run off with somebody – elope
run on – keep running
run on – be powered by
run out (of) – have none left
run out on – abandon
run over – hit with a vehicle
run something past somebody – check
run through something – preview
run to – reach a certain amount
run up (a bill) – spend a lot
run with something – accept and support

Image: https://pixabay.com

12 English Idioms about Climate Change

Here are 12 English idioms about climate change for you to discuss with your class

12 English Idioms about Climate Change

  1. a life-and-death situation
  2. to not be able to get your head around sth (something)
  3. to be getting out of hand
  4. to see with your own eyes
  5. to be running out of time
  6. to be between a rock and a hard place
  7. to make sth up
  8. to be a drop in the ocean
  9. to be a lot of hot air (about nothing)
  10. to be a storm in a teacup
  11. to be not bothered about sth
  12. to be (a bit) over the top / OTT

Listen to Matt discuss these idioms in this free Facebook Live English class:

Image: Thomas Millot

10 English Idioms with Mind - Free Live Class

10 English Idioms with Mind

From make up your mind to out of sight is out of mind, there are lots of English idioms with the word ‘mind’.

We will explore ten of them in a free Facebook Live class tonight (12.09.18). Click the link below to sign up for this free class:

https://www.facebook.com/events/491680741347229/

Here is the presentation that we will use during the class:

Class recording:

FREE VIDEO! 25 Idioms in English to Sound Like a Native

FREE VIDEO! 25 Idioms in English to Sound Like a Native

Watch this fabulous video from linguamarina to learn 25 really useful idioms in English, like:

  • best of both worlds
  • blessing in disguise
  • can’t judge a book by its cover
  • in the heat of the moment

…and many more!

You can find more from Marina on: