Category Archives: Quizzes

FREE Resource Pack for English - Holidays

FREE Resource Pack for English – Holidays

FREE Resource Pack for English – Holidays

Do you deserve a holiday? Are you dreaming about a relaxing break or hitting the beach? What about sightseeing in an exotic place? This pack could be the next best thing! Improve your English lessons immensely with our helpful FREE printable resource pack on the topic of Holidays.

Featuring great material to practice:

Vocabulary, English Idioms, Grammar, Tense Conversion, Verb Forms, Word and Sentence Stress, Speaking and Listening, Connected Speech… and much more!

This resource pack is completely free and in the public domain, so please feel free to share it widely!

If you like it, please share it with your friends on social media – and join us on Facebook!

Direct download: https://purlandtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/holidays-complete-pack.pdf

FREE Resource Pack for English – Holidays

Image by Walkerssk from Pixabay

FREE Resource Pack for English - Creepy Crawlies

FREE Resource Pack for English – Creepy Crawlies

FREE Resource Pack for English – Creepy Crawlies

How much do you know about creepy crawlies? Are you scared of spiders? Fascinated by flies? Worried about worms? Boastful about bees? Improve your English lessons inordinately with our helpful FREE printable resource pack on the topic of Creepy Crawlies.

Featuring great material to practice:

Vocabulary, English Idioms, Tense Conversion, Verb Forms, Word and Sentence Stress, Speaking and Listening, Connected Speech… and much more!

This resource pack is completely free and in the public domain, so please feel free to share it widely!

If you like it, please share it with your friends on social media – and join us on Facebook!

Direct download: https://purlandtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/creepy-crawlies-complete-pack.pdf

FREE Resource Pack for English – Creepy Crawlies

Image by OpenClipart-Vectors from Pixabay

Brexit Terms Explained At Last!

Brexit Terms Explained At Last!

 


Find 20 words about Brexit with our amazing Brexit word search!


Brexit Terms Explained At Last!

1. Brexiter (Brexiteer) vs. Remainer (Remoaner)
Brexiteer = the boldest of the three musketeers, who loved breaking things asunder. (Not to be confused with brexitear = a tear shed by Remain voters as they contemplate Brexit Britain.) Remoaner = one who wishes to run a contest again and again until they win.

2. no deal is better than a bad deal
The original name for the popular Noel Edmonds-hosted quiz show on Channel 4.

3. leave on WTO rules
A way of doing something without thinking about the consequences, e.g. ‘Shall we pay for our meal now?’ ‘Nah. Let’s leave on WTO rules.’

4. crash out
To sleep after energetic activity, e.g. after a hard day on a Remain march or painting faces with the EU flag – or both.

5. People’s Vote
Non-technical, easy-to-understand name for a referendum.

6. kicking the can down the road
A fun activity for kids after Brexit.

7. Brexit means Brexit
A very clear way of explaining what something means, e.g. book means BOOK, grandma means GRANDMA, etc.

8. the will of the people
A document stating what should happen to the people’s assets in the event that Brexit causes mass death (see Project Fear, below).

9. Project Fear
A way of making the German word for four (vier) appear on a wall by means of light passing through a thing.

10. transition period
The greatest ever album by Gerry Rafferty.

11. Northern Irish backstop
A delightful folk trio from Ballymena; their first album was called ‘Blame it on the Backstop’; their second was ‘Don’t Blame it on the Backstop’, and their third will be titled: ‘Don’t Mention the Backstop’.

12. Withdrawal Agreement
A verbal agreement in which both parties agree to be very careful and avoid having children.

13. cliff edge
A prominent leave supporter, Cliff lives alone with his mother in Ramsgate, Kent. Motto: ‘Hey ho! WTO – let’s go!’

14. Brexit fatigue
The unfortunate condition of not having heard enough about Brexit for the past three years.

15. hard border
A tough guy who lives in a boarding house.

16. divorce bill
A situation where you take all of your money and either burn it or give it to a firm of lawyers – your choice.

17. extend Article 50
What happens when you make Article 50 longer, e.g. Aaaaaaarrrrrtttttiiiiiiccccccllllllleeeeeeee5555555555000000000000000000.

18. no deal – no problem
What you say when the bank turns you down for a loan, but you want to look nonchalant then walk away whistling to yourself.

19. soft / hard Brexit
What would happen if Brexit were pillows: soft Brexit = very comfortable and nice, but maybe too squishy; hard Brexit = something is awry here; it feels like there is a rock in it, but it’s good for your back – and your morale.

20. BRINO
An extremely rare kind of Brexit Rhino, with union jack (flag) colouring and a dainty unicorn horn instead of a big rhino one.

21. future relationship
Unfortunately there isn’t any space to discuss thi…


Oops. Sorry, there was a slight error there. Gremlins in the works. Er… Right.

Below are the actual definitions. Match each definition to a Brexit term, above.


Brexit Terms Explained At Last!

a) A 21-month period after leaving the EU on 29th March 2019 when the UK remains in the EU while a trade deal is (hopefully) drawn up.

b) Leave the EU without a deal. (Remainer term)

c) The official deal for leaving the EU, drawn up by the UK Government and the EU.

d) It would be preferable to leave the EU without an agreement, if that agreement was unsuitable.

e) Leaving the EU means a complete break with the EU.

f) Acronym for ‘Brexit in name only’. The Brexiter fear that a deal will make it look as though we have left the EU, when we haven’t. (Brexiter term)

g) A second referendum on leaving the EU. (Remainer term)

h) A payment of €39 billion to be made to the EU by the UK, covering money promised for projects and membership of the EU to the end of the transition period.

i) Putting off making a decision until a future date, as the deadline approaches.

j) The idea that there are varying ‘shades’ of Brexit, from virtually remaining in the EU (soft Brexit) to leaving without a deal (hard Brexit).

k) The fear that leaving the UK without a plan will lead to the end of life in the UK as we know it – a bit like recklessly jumping off a great precipice.

l) The decision to leave the EU, which was made by the majority of voters in the June 23rd 2016 referendum.

m) The idea that Article 50 could be extended by several months or years after the legal deadline of 29th March 2019.

n) A deliberate campaign organised by certain Remainers intended to spread fear and panic regarding the implications of leaving the EU. (Brexiter term)

o) Rely on default trading rules from the World Trade Organisation, rather than having a deal with the EU.

p) A guarantee agreed by the UK and the EU that there will be no hard border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, no matter what the UK’s future relationship with the EU may be.

q) The feeling of being sick and tired of hearing about Brexit.

r) Leave supporter (positive nickname) vs. Remain supporter (negative nickname).

s) The idea that leaving the EU without a deal would be unproblematic. (Brexiter term)

t) A border between Northern Ireland and Ireland that requires a passport, ID, or customs form to cross.

Answers:

1. r)
2. d)
3. o)
4. b)
5. g)
6. i)
7. e)
8. l)
9. n)
10. a)
11. p)
12. c)
13. k)
14. q)
15. t)
16. h)
17. m)
18. s)
19. j)
20. f)


Images: https://pixabay.com

Are You Addicted to your Smartphone? - QUIZ

Are You Addicted to your Smartphone? – QUIZ

Are You Addicted to your Smartphone? – QUIZ

Are you the kind of person who just can’t stop fiddling with your smartphone? Do you feel alone when your phone is in a different room? Do you get anxious when you have to do some kind of real-life activity – like having a bath or making a sandwich – and you can’t fondle your phone or give it your full attention?

If you answered ‘Yes’, ‘Yes’, and ‘YES!’ to these questions, you may be addicted to your smartphone! Take our fun quiz to find out whether you have nomophobia – the technical name for the fear of being disconnected from your smartphone.

Say whether you agree or disagree with the following statements, and keep a note of your answers – if you can manage that without being distracted by your messages…

  1. My smartphone is the first thing I look at when I wake up in the morning, and the last thing I look at before I go to sleep.
  2. I often bump into people when I’m walking down the street, because I’m looking at my smartphone.
  3. My smartphone goes everywhere with me.
  4. I have a pet name for my smartphone.
  5. Nobody is allowed to touch my smartphone except me.
  6. I need to be connected at all times, but I don’t know why.
  7. When I’m not using my smartphone, I’m usually thinking about using it.
  8. My phone is almost an extension of my hand.
  9. I would rather chat on my smartphone than talk to my friends in person.
  10. I can spend hours on my smartphone without noticing the time.
  11. I’m jealous because my friend has a newer smartphone.
  12. I’m never bored, thanks to my smartphone.
  13. I feel anxious when I’m not near my smartphone.
  14. I don’t think it’s rude to repeatedly use my smartphone during a romantic meal with my partner.
  15. It is rude of people to expect me to stop looking at my smartphone just because they’re talking to me.
  16. I don’t see any problem with children and young teens having their own smartphones.
  17. I can’t sit through a film at the cinema without checking my smartphone multiple times.
  18. I recently started wearing glasses – so I can see my smartphone screen better.
  19. People often tell me that I’m addicted to my smartphone.
  20. I love my smartphone.
Are You Addicted to your Smartphone? - QUIZ

Do you believe that you are never alone with a smartphone?

Results:

Mostly agree: You may be showing signs of smartphone addiction. Your phone is more than just a device to you – it’s your friend. Maybe even your best friend. Try spending time away from your smartphone. Go outside; speak to other people; write a letter to a friend and walk to the post office to mail it; spend time doing active hobbies which don’t require you to stare at a small screen for hours on end. Start off with short bursts of non-smartphone activity, then build up to longer, more sustained periods of normality, until – finally – you are ready to downgrade to a dumb phone.

Mostly disagree: You seem to have a more balanced approach to your smartphone. To you it is really just a tool – something that has many useful functions, but not something that you need to physically handle all the time. It’s useful to have it when you need to call someone or send the odd message or text – which is not very often, to be honest. Maybe you just don’t have enough friends to make a smartphone really essential. In any case, you are happy to leave your phone at home in the sock drawer – or even completely forget where you’ve put it, and you do not feel disturbed if you experience – from time to time – the strength-sapping feeling of boredom. For you, it’s normal, and nothing to fear. On the contrary, it is nice not to keep having to check constant updates.

Are You Addicted to your Smartphone? - QUIZ

Do you feel that keeping your head down and your eyes focused on a tiny screen is a good look?


If you liked this content, why not share it with your friends and colleagues! Thank you.

Images: https://pixabay.com and Samuel Zeller

The Ultimate Tardigrade Quiz! - printable PDF worksheet

The Ultimate Tardigrade Quiz! – printable PDF worksheet

Check out our online tardigrade quiz here, or get the printable PDF worksheet version below.

Work with a partner or small group. Print this page onto card, cut up the cards, then lay them face down on a table and mix them up.

Take turns to draw one, read it out loud, and say whether the statement is TRUE, FALSE, or OPINION.

If you get it right, keep your card. The one with the most cards at the end is the winner! Or work alone and sort the cards into the three groups, then check the answers.

Direct download: https://purlandtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/the-ultimate-tardigrade-quiz.pdf

The Ultimate Tardigrade Quiz! – printable PDF worksheet
Teaching Blog: Can you pronounce the English alphabet?

Teaching Blog: Can you pronounce the English alphabet?

This week I decided to hold a spelling bee with my classes. I’ve always liked the idea of spelling bees – in fact, I just like the phrase ‘spelling bee’, although I have no idea what relevance a bee has to spelling. (Yes, I could google it. OK, so I did!)

Despite being 14-15 years old and having studied English for, on average, probably eight years, I thought it would be very unlikely that many (any?) of my Polish secondary school students would be able to pronounce all the letters of the English alphabet. Why? Because in the evenings I teach adults and in general they can’t either. There must be a point early on in the learning process in Poland where the students learn the alphabet, but whether they return to it or not seems to be a moot point.

Teaching Blog: Can you pronounce the English alphabet?

The two word sets that I used for the quiz. Easier (l) and more difficult (r)

Procedure for a 45 min. class:

  1. Register and question: ‘Who can write the English alphabet?’ SS (student/s) came to the board and wrote it – invariably incorrectly. We went through the errors. We said the alphabet together. SS generally sang it too (to the tune of ‘Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star’). I highlighted problematic letters, e.g. the vowels A E I O U, and also G/J, Q, V, and so on. (10-15 mins)
  2. I wrote ten words on the board (20 for higher-level groups), checked and translated them, then asked the SS to practise spelling them – then there would be a quiz. SS were supposed to practise spelling the words in pairs or groups of three. Not all groups did this, so in those cases I fast-forwarded to the quiz. (5-10 mins)
  3. Quiz: SS sat in teams of 3-4. ROUND 1: I asked one SS from the first team to stand up and spell a word from the list, e.g. JOURNEY. If they got it right, their team got 1 point. If not, I asked the next team to spell the same word. If they got it right, they got 1 point, and I asked the following team to spell a different word. ROUND 2: When I had heard all the words spelled correctly (by a trial and error process of SS correcting their wrong answers by listening to others’ right answers), I erased the 10 words from the board and SS had to answer from memory. Of course, this proved harder, but it was possible for most SS thanks to the previous round. ROUND 3: Time-permitting we played a third round, where the words were my choice and SS had to answer from their knowledge. I chose fairly familiar words like ‘computer’, ‘window’, and ‘chair’ – things that were in the round around us. With three rounds the quiz could expand or contract to fit the remaining time and the ability of the SS. The quiz continued for as long as 25 minutes, with SS building up points. The players in the winning team got a good mark (6) as winners of the quiz.

What worked?

  • Compared to previous weeks (e.g. escaping from a desert(ed) island last week) this week’s concept was very simple: can you spell 10 words correctly? The answer was generally a resounding ‘No!’
  • I ensured that the set of ten words in each group (easier and harder – see above) contained all the letters of the alphabet, so that each letter would get an airing. They were also fairly easy/familiar words, so not a lot of pre-teaching was required.
  • In general I enjoyed being the quiz master. There was a lot of pleasure in the tension of waiting for a SS’s next letter, for example: ‘Spell QUEUE.’ ‘Q – U – E – ‘… would they get it right? I sensed other people enjoyed this too. We were willing them on to get it right. Unfortunately, most of the time, they did not.
  • I quickly realised that this was more of a diagnostic lesson – a lesson where we established that there was a problem with matching the shape of letters to specific sounds. The errors were typical for Polish learners of English, and things that I have heard time and again during eleven years of teaching English in Poland: A, E, and I mixed up; c and s mixed up; short e (egg) instead of long ee; g and j mixed up; ‘ha’ instead of H; ‘key’ instead of K; missing Q, ‘air’ instead of R; and missing V or ‘fow’, like in Polish. No surprises, but I was shocked at the scale of the problem. During the first stage of the lesson – writing and saying the alphabet – I tried to use mnemonics, e.g. U sounds like ‘you’, Y sounds like ‘why’, Q sounds like ‘queue’, I = I (me), and so on. It was too little too late. We didn’t scratch the surface with learning the alphabet. It was just a diagnostic lesson – we found out that the need was there! I advised SS to learn it at home in their own time.
  • In some groups over-competitive SS tried to ‘throw’ other competitors by suggesting the wrong letters. I let them do it to an extent because it made the student who was spelling focus and think all the harder.

Challenges:

  • I created a PPT file to use to go through the alphabet with the SS. You can download it here: The English Alphabet (Powerpoint), but as time went on I realised that it was unnecessary and better to get SS to write the alphabet on the board and see their errors right from the beginning. Similarly, I made physical cards with the ten words on at two levels (see above), but it was quicker for me to simply write these words on the board. We had more time for the quiz, without trying to set up the projector and PPT and hand out the cards.
  • Even fairly innocuous words like CHAIR posed serious problems for the SS in terms of spelling. In fact, listening to SS spell CHAIR was particularly painful because every letter posed a problem:

C – pronounced S
H – ‘What is it?’
A – pronounced I
I – pronounced E
R – pronounced ‘air’

  • A few higher-level groups asked: ‘Why do we need to do this?’ ‘I want to see whether you know the alphabet.’ Some SS felt a bit sniffy, as if this was too easy and basic for their level. In the end I was proved right by most SS’s results in the quiz. I explained that it’s a basic skill and that they should know this at their level. I gave the example of filling in forms in the UK, since many of these SS may well be spending time working or studying there. ‘It’s so you don’t get the wrong name.’ One student, Dawid, protested: ‘But it’s normal name – Dawid.’ ‘OK. Can you spell it?’ ‘Yes. D-A-W-A-D.’
  • Towards the beginning of one lesson the SS’s form tutor poked his head round the door to check that some SS had arrived. He quickly noticed that we were saying the alphabet, with the letters on the board. ‘What are you doing?’ he asked, slightly suspiciously. ‘We’re testing whether the students can pronounce the English alphabet.’ ‘And can they?’ ‘That’s what we’re going to find out.’ ‘Hmm,’ said the teacher, and left. I understand that learning the alphabet is most associated with children’s lessons, but experience told me that they would benefit from this ‘reminder’ – and I feel that most of them did. Later I found the teacher and mentioned the results: that almost none of the students could spell all of the words correctly with the alphabet. We talked about what could be done. The problem is that when you’re tied to the course book (as he is) pronouncing letters doesn’t come up again after the first few lessons at beginner level.
  • The lesson time (45 mins) passed fairly quickly with this format. It was a nice simple lesson to run – without any technology or handouts (as in YATCB Method) – and it did feel like a change from doing the setup > preparation > presentation model of the previous few weeks. However, during the quiz I had to wonder whether it wasn’t a little bit, er, dull, compared with those previous lessons.
  • I feel it was worth doing – to diagnose the problem – but the question now is how to build on it and ensure they learn to say the alphabet. Perhaps I can return to it during future lessons and do a five-minute quiz, rather than spending a whole lesson on it.

See also:

Lesson 1.1 Alphabet

FREE Podcast – Learn the English Alphabet – with Matt Purland

NEW! Fun Kahoot! Quiz – Future Tenses

NEW! Fun Kahoot! Quiz - Future Tenses

Check out our latest Kahoot! quiz on the topic of future tenses!

This quiz is aimed at ESOL and English language students from A2 level and upwards.

You can access this great FREE quiz here:

https://play.kahoot.it/#/?quizId=aaa806ac-efcd-4f17-87df-12b022b315ea

Check out our new interactive quiz on Kahoot!

Check out our new interactive quiz on Kahoot!Have you played our new quiz on Kahoot! yet?

It’s all about social networks, like Facebook and Snapchat.

Test your knowledge with 20 questions!

Click here to find it now!

Check out our new interactive quiz on Kahoot!