Tag Archives: listening

15 Top Business English Idioms

15 Top Business English Idioms

15 Top Business English Idioms

Are you up to speed with the latest business English idioms? Here are some of the top English idioms that you could use in a business context. How many of them do you know?

Let’s get the ball rolling!


More English idioms – 15 Fantastically Fishy English Idioms!


1. To get something off the ground = To begin or launch something

To get something off the ground = To begin or launch something

  • I can’t wait to get this project off the ground!
  • I can’t wait to begin this project!

2. To get the ball rolling = To start, e.g. a meeting or debate

To get the ball rolling = To start, e.g. a meeting or debate

  • Let’s get the ball rolling.
  • Let’s start.

3. To think outside the box = To think in an original or left-field / lateral way

To think outside the box = To think in an original or left-field / lateral way

  • Try to think outside the box.
  • Try to think in an original or unique way.

4. In a nutshell = In short

In a nutshell = In short

  • In a nutshell, I just don’t feel that Martin is right for the position.
  • In short, I just don’t feel that Martin is right for the position.

5. ASAP = As soon as possible (acronym)

ASAP = As soon as possible (acronym)

  • I need that report ASAP!
  • I need that report as soon as possible.

6. To stand your ground = To have complete confidence in your position or idea

To stand your ground = To have complete confidence in your position or idea

  • If we stand our ground, they will sign the contract!
  • If we stick to our position, they will sign the contract!

7. The bottom line = The most important thing / the main priority

The bottom line = The most important thing / the main priority

  • ‘What’s the bottom line?’ ‘We must send the orders today!’
  • ‘What’s the most important thing?’ ‘We must send the orders today!’

8. The elephant in the room = The uncomfortable truth that nobody wants to acknowledge

The elephant in the room = The uncomfortable truth that nobody wants to acknowledge

  • The elephant in the room is that we know their sales forecasts!
  • The thing that nobody wants to mention is that we know their sales forecasts!

9. To corner the market = To become the leading seller of a product

To corner the market = To become the leading seller of a product

  • Since 2012 we have been able to corner the market in toothbrush holders.
  • Since 2012 we have been able to become the leading seller of toothbrush holders.

10. To climb the corporate ladder = To be focused on gaining promotion within a company

To climb the corporate ladder = To be focused on gaining promotion within a company

  • John only cares about climbing the corporate ladder.
  • John only cares about trying to get promoted.

11. To hit the glass ceiling = To reach an artificial  limit of promotion, usually due to race, or gender

To hit the glass ceiling = To reach an artificial limit of promotion, usually due to race, or gender

  • Alison feels she has hit the glass ceiling at work.
  • Alison feels she can’t be promoted at work any further, because she is a woman.

12. To be in the red = To be in debt / To be in the black = To be in profit or solvent

To be in the red = To be in debt / To be in the black = To be in profit or solvent

  • No, the company is still in the red, but it could be in the black next month.
  • No, the company is still in debt, but it could be in profit next month.

13. To get the sack = To lose your job

To get the sack = To lose your job

  • Billy got the sack yesterday.
  • Billy lost his job yesterday.

14. To throw in the towel = To quit

To throw in the towel = To quit

  • I’m just about ready to throw in the towel!
  • I’m just about ready to quit!

15. To go / get back to the drawing board = To start again

To go / get back to the drawing board = To start again

  • OK, let’s go back to the drawing board.
  • OK, let’s start again.

 

Meme maker: http://www.imagechef.com/meme-maker

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ESOL Discussion Questions about Cars

ESOL Discussion Questions about Cars

ESOL Discussion Questions about Cars

1. Do you drive? What kind of car do you drive? How often do you drive?

2. How did you learn to drive? How many lessons did you have? What was the name of your teacher? Describe them. Did anything funny, or dangerous, happen to you while you were learning to drive?

3. Have you ever suffered from road rage? Do any of your friends or family suffer from it? What do you / they do? How do you feel about it? How can we avoid road rage? What kind of road users do you dislike? Why?

4. How well do you know the Highway Code, or the rules of the road in your country? Tell me… a) three things that you must do whilst driving, b) three things that you mustn’t do whilst driving, c) describe three different road signs, and tell me what they mean.

5. Describe your car (or a friend’s car) inside and out. Tell me your history with it. Where did you get it from? Why did you buy it? How many miles/km have you done in it? What is the furthest you have travelled in it? Imagine that you wanted to sell it. How would you advertise it?

6. What other vehicles can you drive? What would you like to learn to drive?

7. Do you wear a seatbelt? Why? / Why not? Is it compulsory in your country?

8. What is the future for drivers? Will we all still be driving cars in 30 years’ time? Will we still be using petrol and gas? If not, how will we get around?

9. Extra time: label the parts of a car:

Label the parts of a car

ESOL Discussion Questions about Cars

ESOL Discussion Questions about Cars

Images: https://pixabay.com

FREE Discussion Worksheet: Proverbs – Advice for Life 1

FREE Discussion Worksheet: Proverbs – Advice for Life 1

Have you got a problem? Something weighing you down? Have you tried looking in the book of Proverbs in the Bible for an answer?

Read the different problems below and match each one to advice given in a verse from Proverbs. Check any new vocabulary. Write out each verse in your notebook, then discuss each situation with a partner or small group. What would you do in each situation? How helpful do you think the advice from Proverbs would be today?

Direct download: https://purlandtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/Q-proverbs-advice-for-life-1.pdf

FREE Discussion Worksheet: Proverbs – Advice for Life 1

Answers:

1. Proverbs 27:1
2. Proverbs 10:9
3. Proverbs 16:18
4. Proverbs 15:16
5. Proverbs 31:30
6. Proverbs 16:3
7. Proverbs 10:12
8. Proverbs 22:6
9. Proverbs 12:11
10. Proverbs 15:1

Image: Joseph Chan

Ideas for a Fun Discussion Class - Video Class

Ideas for a Fun Discussion Class – Video Class

Watch our latest free live class about using an object in a discussion class:

Ideas for a Fun Discussion Class - Video Class

Ideas for a Fun Discussion Class – FREE Worksheet

** Join Matt for a free Facebook Live class on this topic on 29th August at 8.15pm CET! **

Using an Object for Discussion Practice:

Work with a partner or small group. Both of you choose a different object that you would like to discuss.

Download and print the free worksheet below and get 20+ great ideas for using an object in a discussion class. Let’s get our students talking!

Direct download: https://purlandtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/using-an-object-for-discussion-practice-1.pdf

Ideas for a Fun Discussion Class - FREE Worksheet (Update)

Image: rawpixel

FREE VIDEO! 25 Idioms in English to Sound Like a Native

FREE VIDEO! 25 Idioms in English to Sound Like a Native

Watch this fabulous video from linguamarina to learn 25 really useful idioms in English, like:

  • best of both worlds
  • blessing in disguise
  • can’t judge a book by its cover
  • in the heat of the moment

…and many more!

You can find more from Marina on:

Idiom of the day - It's up to you

Idiom of the day – It’s up to you

The English idiom it’s up to you means:

  • it’s your decision
  • it’s your choice
  • you can decide

We use it when we want to let another person take a decision, without us getting involved in the decision-making process.

It may be that we can’t decide ourselves, or we don’t have an opinion. It may be that the decision is particularly difficult and we don’t want to get involved – and get the blame if it goes pear-shaped (goes wrong)!

You want the full responsibility for the decision – and all of its consequences – to lie with the person whom it will most affect. Maybe because your help could backfire: if you make the wrong decision for your friend it could negatively affect your friendship:

Alex: I’m thinking about applying to Exeter University.

Sue: OK.

Alex: But I can’t decide. I really like Edinburgh.

Sue: I don’t know.

Alex: But what do you think? They’re both great universities. Come on. You must have an opinion.

Sue: It’s up to you, Alan. I really don’t want to tell you what to do.

Download this FREE eBook Today: Travel English for Busy Travelers

Download this FREE eBook Today: Travel English for Busy Travelers

Travel English for Busy Travelers – Front Cover

David Ellis is an English teacher based in Japan who has been teaching English in the United States and Japan for over 20 years. He has written and published a wonderful eBook for teaching and learning English called Travel English for Busy Travelers.

Best of all – it’s absolutely free! Now, it isn’t everyday that such an interesting and useful teaching resource appears on our desk, so make sure you download your copy today!


Free download (epub, mobi/Kindle, pdf , etc.) of Travel English for Busy Travelers eBook on Smashwords:

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/574638

Published: Sep. 03, 2015 / Words: 27,850 /Language: English / ISBN: 9781310624575


By the way, if you have any questions, you can contact David on Twitter: @DavidLS1

David Ellis, author or Travel English for Busy Travelers

David Ellis, author of Travel English for Busy Travelers

I caught up with David recently and asked him about the book:

What is the background to the book?

“As an English language teacher, I often ask myself how I can help my students become self-sufficient learners.  Many of my students in Japan are overly dependent on their teachers and feel they don’t know how to study independently.  I decided to write an eBook that my students and other students around the world could easily use for self-study.  Travel English for Busy Travelers is a beginner’s level eBook focusing on conversation practice, vocabulary development, and reading comprehension that’s full of self-study exercises with answer keys.

Why did you write your eBook?

“I have co-written several reading textbooks that have been used in Japanese universities. Recently, I have been teaching more and more English conversation classes, so I wanted to write a conversation textbook. However, I didn’t want to write a general conversation textbook. Out of all the classes I teach, I enjoy teaching travel English the most, so I decided to write an eBook that I could use in my travel English classes.

Free eBook - Travel English for Busy Travelers by David Ellis

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Why did you make the eBook free?

“First of all, I wanted the book to be free to download for my students to help them become more independent learners. Second, I hope to attract a larger readership.  I hope that more people will download a free eBook. I’ve done some writing for free magazines and university newspapers. I have enjoyed sharing my writing and curriculum with my students and friends this way. It’s interesting to get e-mail about the eBook from foreign countries. Usually, the sender of the e-mail is asking when the second level eBook will be released.

What are your publishing plans for the future?

“My teaching workload is getting busier, so it’s difficult to find time to finish the second book this year. I almost have the first half of the second book finished, so I will try to release a level 2A eBook by the end of this year. I hope to finish the second half of the next book sometime next year. I would also like to rerelease some chapters from my older reading textbooks that are going out of print. In Japan, most English textbooks have a rather short shelf life.

What are the most popular parts of the book?

“My favourite parts of the eBook are the reading passages on important topics for international travelers. Readers find the dialogues, the Appendix section on “Textese” (texting language), and YouTube videos to be especially helpful. Audio for the eBook is available on my YouTube channel: Travel English for Busy Travelers eBook – on YouTube

What other type of work do you do?

“I have proofread over ten books for vintage fashion writer and photographer Rin Tanaka. Rin has written some very successful vintage fashion books such as Harley Davidson: Book of Fashions, Schott: 100 Years of an American Original, XLarge: True OG Streetwear, and Wesco: Boots that Stand the Gaff.”

Free eBook - Travel English for Busy Travelers by David Ellis

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Thanks David! We really appreciate you sharing your eBook for free!