Category Archives: Idioms

Idiom of the day – They’re a match made in heaven

The English idiom ‘a match made in heaven’ is used to describe a couple who seem absolutely perfect together. They are so suitable for each other that it seems as though their relationship was preordained (arranged in advance) ‘in heaven’.

Olivia: Did you hear that Gerry and Eve have got engaged?

Greta: Yes! Isn’t it cute? I’m so happy for them. They’re so well suited.

Olivia: Yes, they’re such a perfect couple – and on Valentine’s Day too!

Greta: Aah. They’re a match made in heaven, I’d say.

Idiom of the day – Better late than never

JESHOOTS / Pixabay

We use the English idiom ‘better late than never’ to show that we are relieved that somebody or something is coming, while at the same time expressing annoyance that they or it will be late.

[On the phone:]

Peter: Will you be able to bring my laptop back tonight? I really need it to finish my assignment.

Greta: Sure. I’ll be round at about ten. Will that be alright?

Peter: I’ll probably be asleep by then, Greta!

Greta: Sorry! I won’t be there till at least ten, because I’m working at the club till nine thirty.

Peter: OK. Don’t worry. Better late than never.

Idiom of the day – It’s the best thing since sliced bread

Meditations / Pixabay

We use the English idiom ‘It’s the best thing since sliced bread’ to describe something that we think is fantastic or wonderful.

Peter: Can you show me your new phone?

Greta: Here it is.

Peter: Oh, it’s a new iPhone X. These are really amazing. Look at that screen!

Greta: I know. It can do everything – and more! It’s the best thing since sliced bread.

The only question is – what was the best thing before sliced bread was invented?

Idiom of the day – It’s no skin off my nose!

85Miranda / Pixabay

The English idiom ‘It’s no skin off my nose’ means ‘It doesn’t affect me’ or ‘It doesn’t bother me’.

John: So you didn’t get an invitation to the party then?

Peter: No. Did you?

John: Yes, of course! I bet you feel disappointed, don’t you?

Peter: No! It’s no skin off my nose. I didn’t want to go anyway.

Podcast 28. Telling the Time in English

FREE Podcast! 28. Telling the Time in English

Learn how to tell the time in English!

In this podcast you can learn how to tell the time in English. Find all the information that I mention here:

http://purlandtraining.com/free-lessons/elementary-english-course/unit-2-0-transport/lesson-2-7-telling-the-time/

You can find the answers to all the exercises here:

http://purlandtraining.com/free-lessons/elementary-english-course/unit-2-0-transport-answer-pack/

If you enjoyed this podcast, please tell a friend or colleague, subscribe, and leave a review – thank you!

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/purland-on-elt/id1204714487?mt=2
http://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=141070&refid=stpr

 

Any Answers 1 - Image

FREE Podcast! Episode 14 – Any Answers 1 – Use of English Practice

Join in with this fun use of English practice activity that also tests listening skills, then check your answers below. Don’t forget to subscribe and leave a review on iTunes. Thanks! 😀

Here is the original worksheet from Big Grammar Book Intermediate Book 1:

Any Answers 1

Answers:

Any Answers 1 - Answers

Idiom of the day – It’s the thought that counts

Today my friend came home with a cake-making kit and proceeded to make fairy cakes to celebrate my birthday . This is representative of how they turned out. Although the cake wasn’t round, and it was a little bit burned, and the icing was just kind of splodged on top – and the decorations appeared to be randomly scattered around – it was the thought that counted. 😀

We use this phrase when somebody does something nice for us, but it doesn’t really work out very well. ‘Never mind – it’s the thought that counts!’ It’s saying: at least you were thinking of me; it doesn’t matter about the result. 

By the way, the cakes tasted delicious, so it was alright in the end.