Category Archives: Reading

What Time do English People Usually Eat?

pixel2013 / Pixabay

A) Match the sentence halves:

  1. We have breakfast at __________.
  2. We have a mid-morning snack at __________.
  3. We have lunch at __________.
  4. We have a cup of tea and a biscuit at __________.
  5. We have dinner at __________.
  6. We have supper at __________.
  7. We have a snack __________.

a) whenever we feel a bit peckish!

b) one o’clock.

c) six o’clock in the evening.

d) about eleven o’clock.

e) eight o’clock at night.

f) seven o’clock in the morning.

g) about four o’clock in the afternoon.

B) What time do YOU eat during the day?

Answers (no peeping!):

1. f)  2. d)  3. b)  4. g)  5. c)  6. e)  7. a)

Learn 20 New English Phrasal Verbs! Doreen’s Problem

sharonang / Pixabay

a) Translate fifteen phrasal verbs connected with diet and fitness below. Read the dialogue then complete each gap with the correct form of one of the phrasal verbs:

Doreen is talking to her good friend Barbara at a bus stop:

Doreen: ‘You know, Bar, I just can’t seem to 1. _______________. It doesn’t matter what I do. I 2. _______________ for that gym in December, the one that I told you about, and I’ve been 3. _______________ there really intensively, you know, to try and 4. _______________ the calories – honest! – but it’s just no use. When I get home from work there’s my husband Bazza tucking into a lovely chicken sandwich, and I can’t help but join him. After that I might fill up on crisps and popcorn, then in the evening I’ll probably 5. _______________ a few more chicken sandwiches in the kitchen… It’s no wonder that I 6. _______________ weight, is it, Bar?’

Barbara: ‘I don’t know. Maybe you’re just big-boned. Do you still 7. _______________ at different restaurants every weekend?’

Doreen: ‘Yes, but I always mean to have the healthy option. You know, I can’t help wolfing down a delicious plate of chicken and chips and then 8. _______________ a huge cake for pudding.’

Barbara: ‘You know, you mustn’t pig out, Doreen! How many times do I need to tell you? It’s no good for your body. You know, you’ve got to cut back on your food, right, and 9. _______________ your calorific intake.’

Doreen: ‘You what, Bar?’

Barbara: ‘Try to 10. _______________ the fatty food and sweets for a few weeks, and 11. _______________ the crisps for good. Have you thought about 12. _______________ jogging? That would help you to 13. _______________ the calories in a controlled kind of way.’

Doreen: ‘I did try that once – with Bazza. We were exhausted after a few hundred metres and walked to the nearest pub, where we met some pals and 14. _______________ a few drinks – and the landlady 15. _______________ a fabulous chicken pie…!’

b) Find five more phrasal verbs connected with eating in the text. Translate them and write two sentences with each phrasal verb.




Answers:

a) 1. slim down. 2. signed up. 3. working out. 4. burn off. 5. knock up. 6. put on. 7. eat out. 8. putting away. 9. cut down. 10. cut out. 11. give up. 12. taking up. 13. work off. 14. knocked back. 15. dished up.

b) tuck into; fill up on; wolf down; pig out; cut back. Answers will vary.

NEW! Reading Comprehension: First non-stop scheduled flight from Australia to Britain

New on Purland Training this week!

Click here for our brand new reading comprehension lesson plan!

NEW! Reading Comprehension: First non-stop scheduled flight from Australia to Britain

Reading Comprehension: First non-stop scheduled flight from Australia to Britain

 

Idiom of the day – It’s just one of those things

hpgruesen / Pixabay

We say ‘It’s just one of those things‘ about a situation that we don’t like but that we can neither explain nor change. It often refers to something trivial, rather than life-or-death serious. We often accompany this sentiment with a slightly confused shrug of the shoulders:

‘Why did the train have to be late? Today of all days! I really needed to get to work on time.’

‘I don’t know. It was just one of those things, I suppose.’


‘Why is our broadband reception so poor?’

‘Don’t ask me. I guess it’s just one of those things.’

‘No! I’m going to change our supplier!’


‘Why does the toilet paper always tend to run out just at the worst possible moment?’

‘I haven’t got a clue. It’s probably just one of those things.’

Idiom of the day – They’re a match made in heaven

The English idiom ‘a match made in heaven’ is used to describe a couple who seem absolutely perfect together. They are so suitable for each other that it seems as though their relationship was preordained (arranged in advance) ‘in heaven’.

Olivia: Did you hear that Gerry and Eve have got engaged?

Greta: Yes! Isn’t it cute? I’m so happy for them. They’re so well suited.

Olivia: Yes, they’re such a perfect couple – and on Valentine’s Day too!

Greta: Aah. They’re a match made in heaven, I’d say.

Idiom of the day – Better late than never

JESHOOTS / Pixabay

We use the English idiom ‘better late than never’ to show that we are relieved that somebody or something is coming, while at the same time expressing annoyance that they or it will be late.

[On the phone:]

Peter: Will you be able to bring my laptop back tonight? I really need it to finish my assignment.

Greta: Sure. I’ll be round at about ten. Will that be alright?

Peter: I’ll probably be asleep by then, Greta!

Greta: Sorry! I won’t be there till at least ten, because I’m working at the club till nine thirty.

Peter: OK. Don’t worry. Better late than never.

Idiom of the day – It’s the best thing since sliced bread

Meditations / Pixabay

We use the English idiom ‘It’s the best thing since sliced bread’ to describe something that we think is fantastic or wonderful.

Peter: Can you show me your new phone?

Greta: Here it is.

Peter: Oh, it’s a new iPhone X. These are really amazing. Look at that screen!

Greta: I know. It can do everything – and more! It’s the best thing since sliced bread.

The only question is – what was the best thing before sliced bread was invented?

Elementary English Course - Unit 4 - Family

FREE Podcast: Unit 4 of our Free Elementary English Course is Now Online!

Learn about family vocabulary, question forms, pronouns, and much more!

Listen and download the free MP3 lesson: Unit 4 is Now Online! (15 MB, Google Drive)

I talk about the latest unit to be added to our free Elementary English CourseUnit 4.0 – Family. Click below to go there now:

Unit 4.0 Family

The lesson topics are:

4.0 Family (Introduction)
4.1 Wh- Questions
4.2 Yes / No Questions
4.3 Pronouns
4.4 Describing People
4.5 Present Perfect and Present Perfect Continuous
4.6 Auxiliary Verbs
4.7 Punctuation Marks

Whether you are a teacher or learner of English, I hope you will find this wealth of easy-to-read material helpful and a great reference source.

There are also plenty of exercises to get you thinking – along with a complete answer pack, so you can check your answers.

Image courtesy of https://pixabay.com

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