Category Archives: Question Forms

30 ESOL Discussion Questions about Laughter

30 ESOL Discussion Questions about Laughter

30 ESOL Discussion Questions about Laughter

Discuss the following questions with a partner or small group:

  1. What is laughter? Can you spell it? Can you pronounce it? How do you write laughter in your language, e.g. ‘ha ha!’ in English, but ‘Jajajajaja!’ in Spanish?
  2. When did you last laugh? Who or what made you laugh? How often do you laugh? What would I need to do to make you laugh right now?
  3. Do you like laughing? What is the difference between laughing and smiling?
  4. How do we laugh? What happens to our bodies, especially: a) mouth, b) eyes, c) chest, d) diaphragm, e) heart, f) breath? What does laughter: a) sound like, b) look like, c) feel like?
  5. Where do you usually laugh? Why? What effect does the environment have on the potential for laughter?
  6. What effect would laughter have on the atmosphere: a) at a party, b) at a business meeting, c) in church, d) at a comedy club, e) at a funeral, f) in an exam, g) at a family dinner, h) at the doctor’s?
  7. Are you self-conscious about laughing in front of: a) friends, b) family, c) strangers? Why?
  8. Is it easier to laugh in a big group e.g. at a comedy club or at the theatre? Would you laugh as much if you were the only person in the audience? If no, why not?
  9. Is laughter ever wrong? When is laughter inappropriate? Can it be illegal to laugh?
  10. How would you feel if you couldn’t stop laughing and laughed all the time? What would life be like? Is it possible to die laughing?
  11. What is the point of laughter? Is there any evolutionary advantage? Does laughter send out useful signals, e.g. that the one laughing is not a threat? Do animals laugh? Do animals find things funny? If not, why not?
  12. Can robots laugh? Do you think machines will be able to enjoy our sense of humour in the future?
  13. Have you ever laughed till you cried? Have you ever laughed until you couldn’t breathe and thought you might black out, i.e. uncontrollable laughter? What were you laughing at? Do you like that sensation? Why? / Why not?
  14. Can laughter be subversive? Can it be used as a weapon? In what situation(s)? Does satire make you laugh?
  15. Do you prefer to laugh on your own or with friends? Do you laugh at the same things as your friends and family? Do you believe that laughter is infectious? Why? / Why not? Does the Laughing Policeman song (above) make you laugh?
  16. Is there anything that you wouldn’t laugh at? What? Is it possible to laugh when you don’t really find something funny?
  17. Do you know anybody who doesn’t laugh very often – or who never laughs? Why is that?
  18. Are you good at making people laugh? What are the best ways to make other people laugh? How do you feel when a group of people are laughing: a) because of you, b) at you? What is the difference?
  19. What are the benefits of laughter? Is laughter ‘the best medicine’, for example?
  20. How would you describe your laugh? Are you a loud, moderate, or quiet laugher? How did you learn to laugh?
  21. Describe the difference(s) between these different kinds of laughter: a) chuckle, b) giggle, c) cackle, d) guffaw, e) snigger, f) sneer, g) chortle, h) hoot, i) titter, j) snicker, k) roar, l) snort, m) howl, n) fall about laughing? Do you laugh in all these different ways? In what situations would you laugh like that? Can you give an example of each kind of laughter now?
  22. Do you know the meaning of the following idioms about laughter? a) to have a laugh, b) to have the last laugh, c) to get the giggles, d) laughter is the best medicine, e) to be laugh-a-minute, f) he who laughs last laughs longest, g) to laugh your head off, h) to burst out laughing?
  23. Do adults laugh at different things to children? Do women laugh at different things to men? If so, why?
  24. Do you agree that ‘the couple who laugh together, stay together? Is it important for married couples to have the same sense of humour? Why? / Why not?
  25. Do optimistic people laugh more than pessimistic people? If yes, why?
  26. Is it possible to change your mood from angry to happy by forcing yourself to laugh, thus releasing the feel-good chemicals endorphins in the brain?
  27. Do you make funny noises when you laugh? Do you ever say something immediately after laughing, like ‘Oh no!’ or ‘Oh dear?’ If yes, why?
  28. How would you feel if you were walking down the street and heard the following people laugh? a) a baby, b) a group of women, c) a group of teenage boys, d) a lone man, e) a lone woman, f) a lone child? Why? What would be the difference?
  29. Do the things you laugh at change as you get older, or remain broadly the same? Why?
  30. Do you agree with this quotation from the famous poem ‘Solitude’ by Ella Wheeler: ‘Laugh, and the world laughs with you; weep, and you weep alone’? What does it mean?
ESOL Discussion Questions about Cars

ESOL Discussion Questions about Cars

ESOL Discussion Questions about Cars

1. Do you drive? What kind of car do you drive? How often do you drive?

2. How did you learn to drive? How many lessons did you have? What was the name of your teacher? Describe them. Did anything funny, or dangerous, happen to you while you were learning to drive?

3. Have you ever suffered from road rage? Do any of your friends or family suffer from it? What do you / they do? How do you feel about it? How can we avoid road rage? What kind of road users do you dislike? Why?

4. How well do you know the Highway Code, or the rules of the road in your country? Tell me… a) three things that you must do whilst driving, b) three things that you mustn’t do whilst driving, c) describe three different road signs, and tell me what they mean.

5. Describe your car (or a friend’s car) inside and out. Tell me your history with it. Where did you get it from? Why did you buy it? How many miles/km have you done in it? What is the furthest you have travelled in it? Imagine that you wanted to sell it. How would you advertise it?

6. What other vehicles can you drive? What would you like to learn to drive?

7. Do you wear a seatbelt? Why? / Why not? Is it compulsory in your country?

8. What is the future for drivers? Will we all still be driving cars in 30 years’ time? Will we still be using petrol and gas? If not, how will we get around?

9. Extra time: label the parts of a car:

Label the parts of a car

ESOL Discussion Questions about Cars

ESOL Discussion Questions about Cars

Images: https://pixabay.com

Free English Class - Life of Moses

FREE English Class Tonight!

You are welcome to join me for this free English class on Facebook Live! Sign up below or like Purland Training and receive a notification when we go live.

Sign up here: https://www.facebook.com/events/343845069684758/

I will be discussing the amazing life of Moses via some brand new free printable worksheets that you can download.

Please join me!

All welcome.

#English #Class #Free #ELT #ESOL #ESL #EFL #Bible #BibleStudy #Moses #OldTestament #Exodus #Download #Printable #Worksheets #School #Resources #Grammar

Image: Cullan Smith

Brand New Bible Study ESOL Worksheets - Download Now!

Brand New FREE Bible Study ESOL Worksheets – Download Now!

Brand New FREE Bible Study ESOL Worksheets – Download Now!

Let’s improve our grammar skills by learning about question forms in English with the story of Jonah:

Jonah – Wh-Questions 1:

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Jonah-Wh-Questions-1-4077135

Jonah – Wh-Questions 2:

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Jonah-Wh-Questions-2-4077148

Jonah – Yes / No Questions 1:

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Jonah-Yes-No-Questions-1-4077157

Jonah – Yes / No Questions 2:

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Jonah-Yes-No-Questions-2-4077165

Image: Ian Schneider

Story Planning - My Life Without...

FREE Podcast! Story Planning – My Life Without…

Get your students writing and performing with our brand new free printable worksheets and the accompanying free podcast!

Listen and download the free MP3 lesson: Story Planning – My Life Without… (14 MB, Google Drive)

This fun and multifaceted writing activity includes story planning, writing an article or story for a newspaper or magazine, grammar practice in the form of writing wh-questions and yes/no questions, and also group work with students creating, producing, performing, and peer-assessing role plays based on the original stories!

Download the free worksheets below and get your students to use their imaginations on the topic of My Life Without…

Story Planning - My Life Without...

Image courtesy of https://pixabay.com
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Any Answers 1 - Image

FREE Podcast! Episode 14 – Any Answers 1 – Use of English Practice

Join in with this fun use of English practice activity that also tests listening skills, then check your answers below. Don’t forget to subscribe and leave a review on iTunes. Thanks! 😀

Here is the original worksheet from Big Grammar Book Intermediate Book 1:

Any Answers 1

Answers:

Any Answers 1 - Answers

FREE Podcast! Episode 8 – Question Tags

Learn about how we use question tags in English. This episode is a really exciting grammar one, isn’t it? Yes, it is! Don’t forget to subscribe and leave a review on iTunes – thanks!

https://purlandtraining.podbean.com/e/episode-8-question-tags/

You can download the free lesson notes and six worksheets for practising question tags from here:

Podcast 8 – Lesson Notes – Question Tags (PDF)

Question Tags – Six Worksheets (PDF)

Answers to worksheets:

Question Tags Worksheets - Answers

7 facts about question tags:

  1. Statement – usually short – plus question tag, with a question mark.
  2. They are often used in spoken English.
  3. In many languages (e.g. Polish) we can use the equivalent of …yes? In English we can say: yes, yeah, right (Am/E), OK, got it, understand, but the tone can be rude and confrontational/angry; too direct; English is not a direct language; it sounds like an order, and we don’t like direct orders. (In Polish, use tak for checking and no nie or nie prawda for small talk (but this sounds old fashioned – old people say this), or no tag.)
  4. We can use any auxiliary verbs, including modal auxiliary verbs. Present simple can be confusing – you have to choose DO/DOES or BE. Also past simple: DID or WAS/WERE. We use contractions; in rhetorical speech we can say, Is it not? Were we not? etc.
  5. It is not as common with pronoun I. I’m… aren’t I? (This is an oddity – we can’t say am not I? amn’t I? There is no contraction for am not.)
  6. We can use them to sound sarcastic, e.g. ‘That was a great film, wasn’t it?’ My descending tone shows that I believe the opposite – it was not a great film.

They are more difficult to use than they look – because of the thought process…

The thought process of using question tags:

  1. Realise what tense it is

e.g. They’re meeting at ten, aren’t they? (present continuous)

  1. Realise what pronoun is used (e.g. two names become they) and match it

They … they

  1. Is it a singular or plural subject? They = plural
  2. Positive – negative; negative (even without not, e.g. never) – positive; do the opposite

They’re meeting… = positive, so the question tag has to be negative: …aren’t they

  1. Match the auxiliary verb – are > aren’t
  2. Understand the context: need info or checking/making small talk; intonation differs:

we are asking a question; we want an answer: information – voice goes up

we are sure that the listener agrees with us; something is obvious; we are just making (phatic: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phatic_expression) conversation; we want a response that means a quick agreement – voice goes down

We need information – we’re making plans

Lesson Plan:

  1. SS write x short statements on the board – half of them positive and half negative
  2. T elicits how to gain information or check (small talk) – tak? Look at English options; elicit wrong register/tone; SS practise some sentences together with the wrong tone
  3. Try to elicit question tags; discuss the main points and the thought process
  4. SS complete one or more of the worksheets – check the answers

SS write their own sentences with question tags (or for homework)

Other forms:

  • Positive imperative: Stay here, will / won’t you?
  • Negative imperative: Don’t move, will you?
  • Let’s: Let’s go to the fair, shall we?
  • Need to: We need to return this form, don’t we?
  • There is/are: There’s a cow in that field, isn’t there?
  • There isn’t: There isn’t any jam left, is there?
  • Somebody is/isn’t: Somebody is late, aren’t they? / Somebody isn’t… are they?