Category Archives: Reading

ROLE-PLAY: SHOPPING

ROLE-PLAY: SHOPPING

ROLE-PLAY: SHOPPING


— Read on intercambioidiomasonline.com/2018/04/25/role-play-shopping-2/

Making reading fun: Using graded readers with young learners

Making reading fun: Using graded readers with young learners

Making reading fun: Using graded readers with young learners


— Read on oupeltglobalblog.com/2018/04/26/make-reading-fun/

Creating a reading environment | Using readers in the classroom with adults

Creating a reading environment | Using readers in the classroom with adults

Creating a reading environment | Using readers in the classroom with adults


— Read on oupeltglobalblog.com/2018/04/23/creating-a-reading-environment-using-readers-in-the-classroom-with-adults/

What Time do English People Usually Eat?

pixel2013 / Pixabay

A) Match the sentence halves:

  1. We have breakfast at __________.
  2. We have a mid-morning snack at __________.
  3. We have lunch at __________.
  4. We have a cup of tea and a biscuit at __________.
  5. We have dinner at __________.
  6. We have supper at __________.
  7. We have a snack __________.

a) whenever we feel a bit peckish!

b) one o’clock.

c) six o’clock in the evening.

d) about eleven o’clock.

e) eight o’clock at night.

f) seven o’clock in the morning.

g) about four o’clock in the afternoon.

B) What time do YOU eat during the day?

Answers (no peeping!):

1. f)  2. d)  3. b)  4. g)  5. c)  6. e)  7. a)

Learn 20 New English Phrasal Verbs! Doreen’s Problem

sharonang / Pixabay

a) Translate fifteen phrasal verbs connected with diet and fitness below. Read the dialogue then complete each gap with the correct form of one of the phrasal verbs:

Doreen is talking to her good friend Barbara at a bus stop:

Doreen: ‘You know, Bar, I just can’t seem to 1. _______________. It doesn’t matter what I do. I 2. _______________ for that gym in December, the one that I told you about, and I’ve been 3. _______________ there really intensively, you know, to try and 4. _______________ the calories – honest! – but it’s just no use. When I get home from work there’s my husband Bazza tucking into a lovely chicken sandwich, and I can’t help but join him. After that I might fill up on crisps and popcorn, then in the evening I’ll probably 5. _______________ a few more chicken sandwiches in the kitchen… It’s no wonder that I 6. _______________ weight, is it, Bar?’

Barbara: ‘I don’t know. Maybe you’re just big-boned. Do you still 7. _______________ at different restaurants every weekend?’

Doreen: ‘Yes, but I always mean to have the healthy option. You know, I can’t help wolfing down a delicious plate of chicken and chips and then 8. _______________ a huge cake for pudding.’

Barbara: ‘You know, you mustn’t pig out, Doreen! How many times do I need to tell you? It’s no good for your body. You know, you’ve got to cut back on your food, right, and 9. _______________ your calorific intake.’

Doreen: ‘You what, Bar?’

Barbara: ‘Try to 10. _______________ the fatty food and sweets for a few weeks, and 11. _______________ the crisps for good. Have you thought about 12. _______________ jogging? That would help you to 13. _______________ the calories in a controlled kind of way.’

Doreen: ‘I did try that once – with Bazza. We were exhausted after a few hundred metres and walked to the nearest pub, where we met some pals and 14. _______________ a few drinks – and the landlady 15. _______________ a fabulous chicken pie…!’

b) Find five more phrasal verbs connected with eating in the text. Translate them and write two sentences with each phrasal verb.




Answers:

a) 1. slim down. 2. signed up. 3. working out. 4. burn off. 5. knock up. 6. put on. 7. eat out. 8. putting away. 9. cut down. 10. cut out. 11. give up. 12. taking up. 13. work off. 14. knocked back. 15. dished up.

b) tuck into; fill up on; wolf down; pig out; cut back. Answers will vary.

NEW! Reading Comprehension: First non-stop scheduled flight from Australia to Britain

New on Purland Training this week!

Click here for our brand new reading comprehension lesson plan!

NEW! Reading Comprehension: First non-stop scheduled flight from Australia to Britain

Reading Comprehension: First non-stop scheduled flight from Australia to Britain

 

Idiom of the day – It’s just one of those things

hpgruesen / Pixabay

We say ‘It’s just one of those things‘ about a situation that we don’t like but that we can neither explain nor change. It often refers to something trivial, rather than life-or-death serious. We often accompany this sentiment with a slightly confused shrug of the shoulders:

‘Why did the train have to be late? Today of all days! I really needed to get to work on time.’

‘I don’t know. It was just one of those things, I suppose.’


‘Why is our broadband reception so poor?’

‘Don’t ask me. I guess it’s just one of those things.’

‘No! I’m going to change our supplier!’


‘Why does the toilet paper always tend to run out just at the worst possible moment?’

‘I haven’t got a clue. It’s probably just one of those things.’

Idiom of the day – They’re a match made in heaven

The English idiom ‘a match made in heaven’ is used to describe a couple who seem absolutely perfect together. They are so suitable for each other that it seems as though their relationship was preordained (arranged in advance) ‘in heaven’.

Olivia: Did you hear that Gerry and Eve have got engaged?

Greta: Yes! Isn’t it cute? I’m so happy for them. They’re so well suited.

Olivia: Yes, they’re such a perfect couple – and on Valentine’s Day too!

Greta: Aah. They’re a match made in heaven, I’d say.