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20 Great Football Idioms in English to discuss the World Cup!

20 Great Football Idioms in English to Discuss the World Cup!

 

via GIPHY

Harry Kane, England (2018)

Match the football idioms below with their literal meanings:

IDIOMS –

1. the Beautiful Game
2. it’s a funny old game
3. to be a game of two halves
4. a potential banana skin
5. to be honest
6. to play the ball, not the man
7. to be over the moon
8. to be as sick as a parrot
9. to be on a winning streak
10. at the end of the day
11. to go down to the wire
12. to be a big ask
13. to be held to a draw
14. by the skin of your teeth
15. to be a two-horse race
16. to play your heart out
17. to give 110%
18. to be strong on paper
19. to throw in the towel
20. back of the net!

via GIPHY

Bobby Moore, England (1966)

LITERAL MEANINGS –

a) to feel very disappointed
b) to be a competition between two teams or groups only
c) fantastic!
d) to win several times in a row
e) more can happen later
f) the outcome is decided at the last moment
g) to be forced to end a competition with equal points
h) to quit
i) don’t make contact with another player
j) unpredictable things can happen
k) narrowly; only just
l) football
m) to compete with a lot of passion
n) to be a good idea in theory
o) in my opinion
p) an opportunity for something to go wrong
q) ultimately
r) to try as hard as you possibly can
s) to feel very happy
t) to be a difficult thing to ask somebody to do

via GIPHY

Taken from Talk a Lot Intermediate Book 1, which you can download for FREE here.

Answers:

1. l)
2. j)
3. e)
4. p)
5. o)
6. i)
7. s)
8. a)
9. d)
10. q)
11. f)
12. t)
13. g)
14. k)
15. b)
16. m)
17. r)
18. n)
19. h)
20. c)

via GIPHY

FREE Karaoke! Never Enough from The Greatest Showman OST

FREE Karaoke! Never Enough from The Greatest Showman OST

Never Enough from The Greatest Showman (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

Sung by Loren Allred  /  Written by Justin Paul & Benj Pasek

Sing along to the video:

In my latest vocabulary lesson on YouTube, I teach eight foreign words used in English. The lesson was partly inspired by a conversation I overhead at the hairdresser’s. One woman called out to the other as she was leaving, “Call me sometime next week. We’ll have a tête-à-tête.” It’s not the first time my ESL-attuned ear […]

via Why Teach Foreign Words in English? — English with Jennifer

FIFA World Cup 2018 - Discussion Questions for ESOL Classes!

The 2018 FIFA World Cup – Discussion Questions for ESOL Classes!

The 2018 FIFA World Cup – Discussion Questions for ESOL Classes!

Are your ESOL and EFL students keen to discuss the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia, which begins today? You could use these FREE discussion questions to get the conversation going!

(Click to enlarge)

World Cup 2018 – Discussion Questions for ESOL Classes!

  1. Tell me about the World Cup.
  2. What do you like / dislike about it?
  3. Do you agree that there is too much sport on TV?
  4. What are the advantages / disadvantages of big events like this?
  5. Compare four teams.
  6. Rank four players.
  7. Invent your own World Cup song.
  8. Have you ever been to a major sporting event?
  9. What would happen if the World Cup was cancelled?
  10. What is the future for world football?

 

Title image: https://pixabay.com/

Battle of the Commonly Misspelled or Misused Words - FREE Infographic!

Battle of the Commonly Misspelled or Misused Words – FREE Infographic!

Having problems with spelling common English words?

Don’t know whether to use it’s or its? Not sure whether your stationery should be stationary – or is it the other way round?

Check out this wonderful infographic:

New words – 11 June 2018

New words – 11 June 2018

New words – 11 June 2018
— Read on dictionaryblog.cambridge.org/2018/06/11/new-words-11-june-2018/

Summer Vocabulary Practice for ESOL Classes!

Summer Vocabulary Practice for ESOL Classes!

Here are 40 summer vocabulary words and phrases for ESOL and English classes. You can use them to create interesting vocabulary lessons with your English language students.

Check out some of the lesson plans that you can use with these cards here.

Direct download link:

http://purlandtraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/discussion-words-summer-pt.pdf

Summer Vocabulary Practice for ESOL Classes!

Connected Speech in Real Life #1 – From Jar of Hearts to Jar of Farts

The hit song Jar of Hearts (2010) by Christina Perri became the subject of numerous parodies due to many people mishearing the title lyrics as not ‘jar of hearts’ but the rather more odious ‘jar of farts’.

Why did this happen? Well it’s all down to connected speech and the sound connection between ‘of’ and ‘hearts’. This is a cc (consonant to consonant) sound connection and we can see in Lesson 5.7 Connected Speech that we need to change this to a vc (vowel to consonant) connection. When the second syllable in a sound connection starts with a  h  sound we usually delete it and then move forward the final consonant sound of the first syllable. As the voiced consonant sound  v  (from ‘of’) moves forward, it changes to its unvoiced equivalent  f.

So we go from:

jar     of     hearts     (Jar Ov Hartz in Clear Alphabet)

to:

Jar     r     Fartz

The first sound connection ‘jar of’ is vv (vowel to vowel), so we connect with a  r  sound (intrusion). ‘Of’ is a function word, so it is not stressed and after losing its final consonant sound becomes an embedded schwa sound after  r:  Jar r

In short, it’s too difficult for the singer to pronounce  v  and  h  together (‘of hearts’), since a vc connection is required. It’s no surprise then that such a lovely sentiment on paper (‘jar of hearts’) becomes something rather more pungently unpleasant in the listener’s ears. It’s just unfortunate that the normal process of using connected speech to create vc connections has resulted in an entirely different phrase, but one that was humorously relevant.